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Punk Rock

 
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Frank_Jewett
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2007 2:01 pm    Post subject: Punk Rock Reply with quote

Anyone have any suggestions, thoughts, or memories to share?

The first time I ever noticed punk rock was when a local college station played "Ladykiller" by the Vandals. I'm sure I had seen the Ramones earlier, but I didn't take them seriously. Maybe that was the idea.

It's surprising to see how much influence punk had on new wave and other genres that followed since it seemed like a fringe movement at the time. It's also surprising to see how many punk songs are now mainstream.

Frank

(Enjoying "X Offender" by Blondie)
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tdcheetah



Joined: 27 Jul 2006
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Location: The Cheetah's Lair (aka Clarendon VA)

PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2007 4:04 pm    Post subject: Re: Punk Rock Reply with quote

Frank_Jewett wrote:
Anyone have any suggestions, thoughts, or memories to share?

The first time I ever noticed punk rock was when a local college station played "Ladykiller" by the Vandals. I'm sure I had seen the Ramones earlier, but I didn't take them seriously. Maybe that was the idea.

It's surprising to see how much influence punk had on new wave and other genres that followed since it seemed like a fringe movement at the time. It's also surprising to see how many punk songs are now mainstream.

Frank

(Enjoying "X Offender" by Blondie)


Well, I'm certainly not the expert on punk here at Menagerie Central but I'll ask the in-house expert (who saw many of the seminal bands during punk's peak) and report back his top 5 faves or something like that.

FWIW, Black Flag and the Ramones have both gotten a lot of positive mention when we've talked about punk. I haven't gotten up the nerve to try Black Flag yet, but I did finally buy a Ramones 2-CD Anthology comp and have been unexpectedly enjoying a number of songs on it: one I had heard and loved when another band covered it (that would be "California Sun", as done by a local Annapolis art-school group called Johnny Monet and the Impressionists, who also did this benzedrine drone/stop-action version of Bowie's "Suffragette City" that was absolutely to die for) or in ads ("Blitzkrieg Bop"), plus a few others that were either played for me to try to get me interested in the band ("Danny Says" -- you gotta love a song about the band's manager -- "Sheena is a Punk Rocker", and "Rock and Roll High School") or that have randomly popped up on the iPod and gotten high marks from me ("It's Not My Place", "Garden of Serenity").

Me, I would consider Blondie more New Wave (disclaimer: I own _Parallel Lines_ and _Eat to the Beat_ plus a tribute album called _Platinum Girl_, but never felt strongly enough about later stuff like "Rapture" to buy future albums), but she does kind of straddle the genres, and apparently she originally came out of the punk scene...


Lee

(Fave 5 Blondie songs right now are probably: "Dreaming", "Atomic", "Victor", "I'm Not Living In The Real World". and "I'm A-Gonna Love You Too", but almost everything off _PL_ and _EttB_ is pretty enjoyable. Except for "Shayla", which just bores the heck out of me. Her voice sounds beautiful as usual, but *yawn*. Even "Sound-A-Sleep" is oddly much more interesting and energizing to me than "Shayla".)

(
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Frank_Jewett
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2007 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks!



You might get a kick out of these retrospectives.



1976




1977


The 1976 retrospective includes links to several Blondie songs.

Frank
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eron



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PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2007 9:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been in a never ending struggle stating that punk was one of the worst things to ever happen to rock (along with Geddy Lee and Bono) and all it did was create a market for look and energy over talent (I just don't care for Geddy). You hear about these punk fans of the 70's screaming about corporate rock and hear rock journalists (Phil Seymour Hoffman in Almost Famous was a great example of what I've read from old articles, as we was Lester Bangs, an old article :) )talk about the death of rock... when there were amazing albums coming out and amazing albums that followed.

While some good artists came out of the movement (How many artists are considered to have a distinctly punk sound... sound like the Clash?) I think for the most part, after over 30 years of punk, it did nothing for rock that was needed or truly missing.

I think the bands that came out after the punk explosion and its direct influence on the underground scenes and kids who grew up to have great bands in the 90's would have still been great and maybe even better if they didn't have punk to distract them. Maybe Kurt Cobain would have learned how to sing.
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Frank_Jewett
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2007 12:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seems like pop music progresses from gritty, literal, immediate songs to polished, elliptical, heavily produced music before reverting back again.

I've been working my way back and forth across cycles. A few months ago I was listening to a lot of prog rock. "Song for America" by Kansas is a terrific composition, but I can't hum it while I'm walking around.

I arrived at the Brit Pop party ten years after it ended and discovered that Oasis was just the tip of the sixties revival iceburg. I enjoyed Blur, Charlatans, and glam revivalists like Suede, but then I found Radiohead.

Radiohead is a band that embodies the progression described above. They quickly ditched the simple, literal style of Brit Pop in favor of increasingly synthetic, layered soundscapes with elliptical lyrics.

Now I'm back to simplicity with punk rock, or at least whatever the compilers considered punk rock. I was surprised to find how much it sounds like fifties and sixties music with rockabilly and surf influences.

In a few weeks I'll probably start listening to something more complex again.

Frank

==========

Two-Fer Saturday Picks To Click: Eddie & The Hot Rods (even the name is retro)

Teenage Depression

Do Anything You Wanna Do
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tdcheetah



Joined: 27 Jul 2006
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Location: The Cheetah's Lair (aka Clarendon VA)

PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2007 10:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Frank_Jewett wrote:
Seems like pop music progresses from gritty, literal, immediate songs to polished, elliptical, heavily produced music before reverting back again.

I've been working my way back and forth across cycles. A few months ago I was listening to a lot of prog rock. "Song for America" by Kansas is a terrific composition, but I can't hum it while I'm walking around.


Well, that's Kansas for you. :) Some prog rock you can hum at least bits of though. How many times have I found myself humming Yes's "Long Distance Voyager" medley when the sun breaks through the clouds or something equally cheerful and uplifting happens?

Quote:
I arrived at the Brit Pop party ten years after it ended and discovered that Oasis was just the tip of the sixties revival iceburg. I enjoyed Blur, Charlatans, and glam revivalists like Suede, but then I found Radiohead.

Radiohead is a band that embodies the progression described above. They quickly ditched the simple, literal style of Brit Pop in favor of increasingly synthetic, layered soundscapes with elliptical lyrics.


You'll have to comp some Brit Pop recommendations for me then. Somehow I've continued to avoid everyone you just mentioned (probably through sheer fear of not liking them and losing my Brit pop cred ;) ), except for Radiohead, who were smartly billed to me as an "electronic" band.

I brought home _Ok Computer_ and after one run-through, forced Marc to listen to it as well,l saying at the end, "Isn't this basically what the Beatles would have sounded like if they'd kept on going?" "Oh yeah, totally."

Quote:
Now I'm back to simplicity with punk rock, or at least whatever the compilers considered punk rock. I was surprised to find how much it sounds like fifties and sixties music with rockabilly and surf influences.


It's definitely a reaction to the big sound/musicianship of AOR/classic/prog/operatic rock (not that some of those guys couldn't pull off a nice little rockabilly tune if they wanted to -- for example, a local swing/rockabilly/Elvis-heavy band routinely puts Queen's "Crazy Little Thing Called Love" into their setlist).

Looking at the artist list for _No Thanks! The '70s Punk Rebellion_:

Okay, I would classify a fair number of these as "punk" or "coming from punk"... I'm not so sure about Modern Lovers [AllMusic says they were influenced by Velvet Underground and "inspired" punk], and I have absolutely no doubt Joe Jackson would be horrified to be considered punk (but is no doubt happy to accept the royalties, he's not stupid).

Quote:
In a few weeks I'll probably start listening to something more complex again.


Yep. and that's one of the hidden hazards of iTunes, or especially in my case, of the iPod since it is only a subset of my entire music collection. Sometimes it tries really hard to stick you in a genre you're just not in the mood for right then. In those situations, the "forward" button is my friend. :)

Let's see what happens if I would put the Pod on random this morning:

Tit for Tat - Neil Sedaka (pop singer-songwriter)
Home - Paul van Dyk (trance)
Big Beat - X2000 (trance)
Blow It Out - The Features (psych rock)

NOTE: The Features are a band you've probably never heard of unless you attended Kings of Leon's breakout tour, in which case they rocked your socks off as the opening act and you bought all their CDs during the intermission. :) AllMusic describes them as "a psychedelic rock outfit that plays fresh, off-kilter pop that sounds like a head-on collision between Ray Davies and Elvis Costello with the Elephan 6 Collective picking up the pieces and putting them back together in the American South." I don't know anything about Elephant 6, but insert your favorite neo-psych band there and you're still pretty close. Their website lists their influences as Talking Heads, The Kinks, Elvis Costello, Randy Newman, and Roxy Music. Works for me.

Back in the U.K. - Scooter (hi-NRG dance)
Honky Tonkin' - Joe Ely (West Texas country)
You're Mine - Robert Palmer (from one of RP's world music style records)
Just the Way You Are - Billy Joel (pop singer-songwriter)
Half the World - Rush (AOR/prog rock)
Festival Megamix: Move On Baby - Cappella (dance beat)
I'll Be There - The Jackson 5 (classic Motown)
Carouselambra - Led Zeppelin (operatic rock)
High Tide - Ryuichi Sakamoto (pop/world music/pianist)

WARNING: I may own more Ryuichi Sakamoto than anyone in the U.S., or at least the East Coast, so it's easy for him to crop up a lot in my listening. However, I was still too intimidated to try to shop, much less buy, anything in a record store while I was in Japan. Maybe next time. :)

I Could Eat Your Words - Patricia Barber (jazz/cabaret pianist)
Kathleen - Patty Larkin (folk rock singer/songwriter/guitarist)
One Fine Day (Quirk Mix) - Astralasia (ambient dub/tribal house/electro-hippie)
Dancing in the Street - David Bowie and... oh dear, better skip this one ;)

It wouldn't be so bad except that the music video is burned into my mind. ;)

Auf Wiedersehn - Cheap Trick (70s pop)
Heat of the Moment - Asia (AOR rock)
Love is How You Make It - Gong (prog rock)
Working Man - Rush (but from their Live in Rio album, skip this version)
Heavy Traffic - Elton John (pop singer/songwriter/pianist)

NOTE: I know it's "cool" to put EJ down or only like his Greatest Hits I era stuff, but I think _Reg Strikes Back_ is way underrated. It almost makes up for having to hear "Candle in the Wind" every time there's a Princess Diana special... almost. Still, EJ pulls out his visual storytelling skills like:

"He used to shake the French fries down on 12th and Maine
Now he stays up nights on apple juice and cocaine"

Hell's Half Acre - Robbie Robertson (ex-Band member ;) )
Why I Don't Know - Lyle Lovett (country/jazz singer/songwriter)
Lonesome Train Whistle - The Reverend Horton Heat (talk about rockabilly!)
Thinking of You - Joe Satriani (rock guitarist/instrumental composer)

Hmm, the next song would be a dub remix of Eric Clapton's "Get Lost", so perhaps this would be a really good time to sign off for now? :)


Lee

(On the other hand, the next song was gonna be from Blue Oyster Cult...)
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eron



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PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2007 1:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tdcheetah wrote:
You'll have to comp some Brit Pop recommendations for me then.


http://www.edge102.com/station/ongoing_history_of_new_music.cfm?recID=181&ell=8943&pge=1

Brit Pop part 1 through 4. Also check out the Stone Roses feature. They helped ignite the genre. Hell, listen away to Alan Cross and some of the most fascinating, informative and enjoyable radio shows I've ever heard. He is a real treat.
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Frank_Jewett
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2007 1:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looks like some pre-Wave got shuffled into the punk, though that may reflect the belief that punk was more about simplicity and tradtional rock and roll than screaming, drugs, and desperate to be noticed hairstyles. I always got a kick out of punks who whined about people staring at them and thinking they were different, given the great lengths they had gone to to look different and be stare worthy. It's not like those were "bed-heads."

If you liked earlier periods of British music, you'll probably like Brit Pop.

Oasis and Ocean Colour Scene sounded like Beatles/Badfinger.

Blur sounded like the Kinks before switching to the inferior US indy sound. WOO-HOO!!!

Charlatans are essentially the modern Stones. Early on they were shoegazers pulling from The Who and Spencer Davis Group, then they settled into a Stonesian groove while experimenting with the popular sounds of the day... you know, just like the original Stones.

Radiohead is a triangulation of the Beatles, Pink Floyd, and Alan Parsons Project, which was Pink Floyd production applied to futuristic soft rock concept albums. Odds on the Beatles getting there were low unless Paul really did die in the late sixties and George decided to follow John and Yoko through a journey of popular estrangement. I doubt Lennon had it in him after frying his brain with massive doses of LSD. Paul would have kept dragging the group toward lighter fare and their rock and roll roots.

Behind those groups are a plethora of groups that add one or a few really good tunes to the mix. Shoot me your address and I'll send you some.

I'll play along and shuffle my iPod.

Misled by Kool and the Gang - Funk/soul from the mid-eighties

Runaway Train by Soul Asylum - Mellow post-grunge ballad

Under the Boardwalk by the Drifters - Early sixties R&B staple

If You Can Want by Smokey Robinson and the Miracles - Great overlooked Motown tune

Hello Darlin' by Conway Twitty - For those of us who grew up listening to country music on commercials during WCW Saturday Night

Frank


Last edited by Frank_Jewett on Sun Nov 18, 2007 1:56 pm; edited 1 time in total
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eron



Joined: 01 Aug 2006
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2007 1:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F39RS3I0D0Y

I'll post that to save Frank the time ;)

"You'll never live like common people,
you'll never do what common people do,
you'll never fail like common people,
you'll never watch your life slide out of view,
and dance and drink and screw,
because there's nothing else to do."
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Frank_Jewett
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2007 2:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, eron! And thanks for the podcast links, too.



Pulp is hit or miss for me, but I've grown to like Lipstick from "HIS N' HERS" quite a bit.

Frank
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