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Cornette 'retires'

 
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Yakuza Rich



Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 770

PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 2:32 pm    Post subject: Cornette 'retires' Reply with quote

I didn’t know this, but I was watching Breaking Kayfabe with Jim Cornette from Kayfabe Commentaries where Cornette states that he has ‘quit’ the wrestling business. The entire interview goes thru part of the problems he had with Russo and TNA and then the equally clusterfuck-ish Ring of Honor.

Cornette is a bit difficult to put a finger on the truth only because the business is filled with people that lie in these interviews and sugarcoat their faults, over-promote their strengths and as always, blame anybody but themselves. But with Cornette most of his stuff makes a lot of sense and you have an industry that has failed miserably from 1990 on outside of the WWE.

It’s abundantly clear that Cornette has a great deal of passion for the industry, but as he said he started to realize that ‘the rib is on me.’ I started to think about what I have been passionate about since I was a boy, the golf industry, and if it turned into a clusterfuck like many of these wrestling promotions have. And in some sense, it has. I just couldn’t help but think if that was the case with golf, I would just feel like the game of golf deserved what it got.

You will get the sense that Cornette likes the attention of being the martyr and the savior that has to bail out the mess and then being the outspoken critic that diehard fans can rally behind. But if he has truly quit the business, then you can see that he’s had an epiphany of sorts and I think it does lend credibility to what he is saying.

One of the most astounding parts in the interview is how he discusses that he wrote the proposal to Sinclair Broadcasting of how they could work together and not only did Sinclair Broadcasting accept the proposal, they bought out the entire company. In order to make the product look better than a 4th rate promotion, Cornette proposed that they find an empty building and turn it into their own ‘arena’ and run their base shows thru there. Sinclair Broadcasting went along with it, until they didn’t. And in order to run shows in less than ‘major league’ venues they came up with the idea of installing bleachers and using pipe, wood and drape to give it more of a professional league look. One problem, since they don’t have a ‘base’ arena they have to rent the wood, pipe and drape and that costs $10K a show.

Yikes.

This is where pro wrestling reminds me of the golf course industry. In the golf course industry you have so many courses that are dying because you either get career golf people that have never been part of a business that was a financial success. Or you have people that have been successful in business, but they have no clue about how the golf industry works.

I think that is what you get with wrestling. That and it is also a poor business model since it is so character driven and the only way you get those characters over is thru television (although these days they do have internet). All of it is pricey and it can work against a promotion because 1 or 2 bad looking shows and draw disappears.

In the end, I felt a bit sad about the situation because I think Cornette is a very sharp wrestling mind and has been good for wrestling. He’s been able to find ways to generate money for promotions and wrestlers. Everything he has done in the business he has been successful at one time or another. But, he doesn’t fit into the WWE and the other promotions end up trying to mimic McMahon and Co., only to their detriment. And he doesn’t want part of them either. I think in the end he needs to be in more of a consultant role. That way if they don’t do as he says, he doesn’t get hurt by it and generally consultants yield a weird amount of power in any company because…that’s what the company is paying them for.

And I will be surprised if in 3 years both TNA and ROH are still around.




YR
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jdw
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Joined: 01 Sep 2005
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 2:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Really good piece. I saw the promo for that and was tempted to get it. Tend to avoid all of those shoot interview because as you say, it's a lying business filled with liars who can't help but lie when you point a camera at them. Jim's sounded interesting.
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Yakuza Rich



Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 770

PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 5:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The first 40 minutes or so he re-hashes over much of the same anti-Russo and TNA mess. Sean Oliver did ask some really good questions, particularly about his anger issues with relation to trying to book and lead a promotion.

Cornette and Oliver had a bit of a rift but said that they had long resolved it. I did get the sense that Oliver still had issues with Cornette because he seemed to, at times, have the look of 'I've heard this before.'

Not that I think Jim was lying. He actually comes off as more honest than most in the business. And he can at least sell me on the logic behind what he was/is thinking. But I think Oliver was feeling like this is the same ole angry Cornette that brings the hell, fire and brimstone anytime somebody doesn't do something his way. I also think Oliver's views are more of how the business has changed and Cornette has to adapt, but according to Cornette he really wasn't the booker at RoH and he did say that he liked then-bookers Adam Pearce and now Delirious.

A lot of the time you'll hear Cornette talk about wrestling has to 'be taken seriously.' I think he started to better illustrate his point here. I don't think it has to be taken seriously or made seriously in the WWE because they have long branded their product for what it is. But if you're running a small promotion looking to not come off as bush league, you cannot afford to do overtly comedic gimmicks and angles or you'll lose the new viewers. It's sort of like the local restaurant that tries to use the same gimmicks and sales pricing as say an Olive Garden. You're going to lose that game so you're better off presenting a different product that is perceived as 'better.'

The pricing for Kayfabe Commentaries is a bit high for my tastes. I paid $20 for the On Demand. I will say they do a very nice production job and Sean Oliver is the best interviewer in the business, bar none.








YR
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jdw
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 6:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't know Sean, and haven't seen any of his interview (seriously... I avoid shoot tapes like the plague). But the trailer did have one shot that was either wide or flipped to Sean in the middle of a Jimbo response that really had a near-bored "I've heard this before" look. I don't think it did the trailer well to have it in there. :)

John
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khawk20



Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 234

PostPosted: Fri Jan 10, 2014 11:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oliver does his job very well.

Put it this way: When you watch his interviews, you will find yourself lamenting the guys that only ever had a shoot done by RF or someone similar. The questions asked and the flow of the interviews are easy to watch and sensible in their presentation. So many guys who did shoots with the Clown College would probably come off a lot differently and be far more interesting to listen to if they had one done this way.

I'd give one a try at some point, just to see the difference that a properly filmed, well-thought out shoot-style interview can make in the viewing experience.
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Yakuza Rich



Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 770

PostPosted: Mon Jan 13, 2014 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree. I don't think I would put Oliver at 'expert' interviewer status, but he's really good. Mainly because if the interviewee doesn't have much to say then the shoot interview kinda lulls and they resort to silly fan questions. The Perry Saturn shoot was a good example of this because, for better or for worse, Saturn really didn't have much bad to say about anybody (outside of Mike Graham and Matt Hardy) and after about an hour they got thru his crazy life when he was homeless and his crazy life from the WCW/WWE days. It wasn't really Saturn's fault, it just went on too long.

What I do like about Sean is that he has a keen sense to know when to ask questions to press further and when to question something that doesn't seem truthful and when to just let the interviewee speak and if they are lying...he lets their words bury themselves.






YR
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