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Tarantino's new western is in Ultra Panavision 70; Dec. 25
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Ken Viewer



Joined: 04 Aug 2006
Posts: 308

PostPosted: Tue Dec 01, 2015 4:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My ex-wife and all of my in-person friends have had to hear me rave about Ultra Panavision 70 and/or Super Panavision 70 for over half a century.

So the least I can do is invite them to join me at a specific performance of "The Hateful 8" -- which I've done. I assumed it would open at the largest-screen working-theater in Manhattan, the Ziegfeld. But that theater is not showing it.

I still can't make plans or purchase tickets because the distributor won't release the list of houses scheduled to show it. I've got other people to consider, and for me, it's all becoming a pain in the ass.

One theater that's certain for the film is in the East (Greenwich) Village and I'm on the Upper West Side and it's too much walking for me.

I assume the distributor booked the Cinerama Dome for you Los Angeles guys.
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Ken Viewer



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PostPosted: Fri Dec 04, 2015 10:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For you Los Angeles-area movie fans;

The film is contracted for a 70 MM release on Christmas Day in The Landmark theater, in Long Beach's Edwards 26, which may or may not be an IMAX-only release (call the theater) and in Irvine at Edwards Irvine Spectrum 21 in IMAX and in "RPX," whatever that is. They may add theaters to this list.

No listings for the Pasadena theaters yet.

So far, miserable bookings.

In Manhattan, the AMC/Sony/Loew's Lincoln Square, which is likely the multiplex with the highest per-screen grosses in the U.S. Hope it isn't in IMAX but it will be hell to deal with the standard mob-scene at that joint. Also a theater in the East Village and the Regal E-Walk on West 42nd Street.

Ken
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Ken Viewer



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PostPosted: Fri Dec 04, 2015 2:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This could be used as the all-new Tarantino projection tent. It could be set up in parks, wide sidewalks and building roofs. If electricity isn't available, this thing can be powered by cooking gas.

It's the cat's pajamas as featured in a 1907-1908 catalog for travelling salesmen offering full theaters, equipment for them, etc., as reprinted by Darren Nameth.


https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xal1/v/t1.0-9/12106718_10154303998402388_7363344317897908566_n.jpg?oh=251137e4fec0d167e38b5c83e79b5f3f&oe=56ADB171


Perfect venue to see a 70 MM non-Ultra Panavision print of the Taratino movie. As far as I can tell, now that the Seattle Cinerama theater has been delisted as a venue for the film, there is not one theater in the U.S. scheduled to show the film on a deeply-curved screeen.

No curved screen, no Ultra Panavision showing. Ben Hur, in its premiere on Broadway in 1959, was projected onto a flat screen at the Loew's State. But it was not represented as an Ultra Panavision presentation. It was in "Camera 65."

Every Ultra Panavision film released in New York City was shown on a Cinerama-type screen (and advertised as in both Cinerama and Ultra Panavision).

I'll go see the picture on a flat screen (won't see it in IMAX) and then form a final opinion. The Weinstein company has dropped the Ultra Panavision 70 logo/trademark from its ads aimed at the voters in the Academy Awards contest.

Ken
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Ken Viewer



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PostPosted: Sun Dec 06, 2015 6:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Reportedly the Cinerama Dome, in Hollywood, will have a one-time-only showing of the Ultra Panavision 70 version of the film tomorrow, DECEMBER 7TH. Call the theater, even tonight, to verify, and if the rumor is true, find out how you can get a seat.

If it's a totally private screening, find out what time it's at and, if you're like me when I was younger, get there early and ask attendees if they have an extra ticket. Bring a large handwritten sign, if you will.

Again, check with the theater's staff before going there. If it's an early screening, you might go there tonight and sleep in your car to be first on the beggars' line.

Ken
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Steve Yohe



Joined: 01 Aug 2006
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Location: Wonderful Montebello CA

PostPosted: Sun Dec 06, 2015 10:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Man Ken....you really are into this movie! As for me, I can wait. Go see Brooklyn while you waiting. So it will be at the dome in 70mm. I'll see it after the 25th some time.---Yohe
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Ken Viewer



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PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2015 10:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Steve Yohe wrote:
Man Ken....you really are into this movie! As for me, I can wait. Go see Brooklyn while you waiting. So it will be at the dome in 70mm. I'll see it after the 25th some time.---Yohe


This from a guy who proclaims he has seen "King Kong" 250 times? The Dome's scheduled film for the rest of the year (in the main theater) is "Star Wars, Episode 90." My passion is for the abandoned 70 MM film process, not Tarantino. Just for releasing the film in Ultra Panavision 70 (now questionable in NYC), the film and process got an advance article in the New York Times.

These days in New York City, it is a misery to go to a theater to see a motion picture. To get a clear-view seat in those nearby theaters that have comfortable seating, ya have to get to the theater a half-hour in advance of the showing, sit through 20 minutes of repetitious, dreadful commercials, stick your parka under the seat where the goo from last year is unless you want to have it on your lap for two hours, use filthy bathrooms if the water on the floor is not too deep, and part with some $12-or-more depending on whether the theater offers a seniors discount.

And you have to get there and back.

I watch 'em when they're available on Netflix-by-mail, even though I have Chromecast installed on my TV.

Things change as we age. If I want to be in a crowd, I'll go, for free, to a museum or a funeral. There's a set of groupies hereabouts that goes to the funerals of celebrities. Those folks will even go to an open wake if there's free food there.

Ken
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jdw
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2015 10:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The movie theater across the street is perfectly nice for one of these 16 screen thingies. Seats are perfectly comfy compared to the 70s & 80s. Site lines are good. As long as we don't go on opening night/weekend for one of the big movies, Yohe and I don't have issues getting a decent seat when showing up about 10 minutes before the "start time". It seems everyone these days knows there's 15-20 minutes of bullshit trailers, and tends not to worry about getting in until the "start time".

The times we tend to have tough times with seats is when (i) we're watching our 3rd movie of the night, (ii) it's a big movie on the 2nd or so weekend, and (iii) we're coming over from watching our second movie and cutting it close. What tends to suck at that point is that we paid for our tickets, while knowing from the box office that it's clear that at least 50% of the people in the theater are just freeloading another movie. I tend to get pissed since we paid... while Steve ends up happier since we might have to sit down front where he likes it. :P
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jdw
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2015 11:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

On the flip side, I do get seeing a big movie on a big screen. I use to do it in high school and college and for a few years after. Good memories. But at some point I got too old to worry about driving out to Westwood or Hollywood to see it.

In turn, a good number of the "chain" theaters have gotten much better, especially those built or upgraded in the 00s. Seats are better. Aisle in front of the seat have gotten better where you're not so squished if someone has to get up and use the head. The newer seating floor plan tends to be much more "vertical" than "flat" in the old days, so there never really is a worry anymore if you're sitting behind someone tall as the sightlines are excellent. Cup holders are nice. The screens, sound systems and project systems are vastly better than the old chains. Are they as great as the big old icon screens? I'd say the sound systems are better these days in a good chain than they were even when seeing something like Empire Strikes Back at the Avco in Westwood back on opening night in 1980... and that was with Lucas churning out the best sound around at the time. Sound tech has gotten better, and they've gotten easier for a decent multi-screen theater to toss into up.

Picture? I agree that nothing is the same as a big screen... well... at least if you're far enough back to take it all in easily without having to rubber neck between things on opposite ends of the screen. On the flip side, I do think that projection tech has gotten better *on average* over the years with the move to digital. It's very rare that I have a movie out of focus, or that the shows the "wear & tear" that film projection did. I tend to think that 3D can be a big jerk off, and *much* of IMAX in multiplexes is a jerk off... though it *is* better than the same flick on a regular screw in the same multiplex.

John
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Ken Viewer



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PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2015 3:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The theater nearest me is a mile south on Broadway and 84th Street. It's the Amc/Sony/Loew's 84th Street sixplex. Six holes, not one of which even has 200 seats in it. Sound from adjacent theaters bleeds into other theaters. But it is a river to its people.

This is a two-year-old review of the theater by the weekly newspaper "The Gothamist," although conditions there have since significantly improved, patrons say:

AMC LOEWS 84TH STREET: Worst Movie Theater One dishonorable mention: I had the misfortune of seeing Skyfall at this Upper West Side theater a few months ago. The house lights stayed on a half hour into the movie, a woman stood up halfway through, started yelling and threatened to hit her seat neighbor and I spent the whole film convinced small creatures were nibbling my ankles. The theater's also been plagued by complaints of poor sound quality, dirty conditions, late movie starts, rowdy patrons, screaming babies, broken seats, unfocused projection screens, rude employees and all around unpleasantness for $14 a show. It's been described best as a "nightmare wrapped in a nightmare." Fandango at will, but don't say we didn't warn you. —Rebecca Fishbein

More later.

Ken
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Ken Viewer



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PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2015 5:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Manhattan, in the minds of movie-theater executives, is not a market that will support more seats in movie theaters. Perhaps they believe the market here is too full of people over age 40-or-so, who have memories of large theaters and movie-going as something special -- as in the old movie palaces that could seat over 3,000 people at one showing of one film.

Television killed those theaters, as did the changing of ethnicities as the City renewed itself. When I moved into the building where I still live some 40 years ago, there was a theater around the corner showing Spanish-language films. There was another four blocks north that showed films in English, and there was one three blocks south. Broadway, even this far north, was lined with dying theaters built in the 1920s and never upgraded.

Now the neighborhood has no open theaters (Alamo supposedly rented the shell of one of them to rebuild and run, but that deal turned to dust). There's not a functioning movie house on Broadway, going north, between here and 181st Street. Yet apartments in 1920s buildings around here sell for over $250,000-per-room. The larger the apartment, the more per-room it's worth. We've got the campus and residence halls of Columbia University around here. Don't they go to movies?

The neighborhood is now full of young white married people with small children. That was the very-same market the old theaters on Broadway were built for.

The last time a theater-chain owner got out of his chauffeur-driven limo and walked the streets in this neighborhood may have been when Marcus Loew or William Fox did it in the 1920s.

Old mobility-limited people like me, the few of us who still watch movies, don't or can't make a trip down to 42nd Street or 23rd Street where the new plexes are. When I was more mobile, I used to attend a multiplex on 23rd Street in the daytime and purchase one ticket. Sometimes I'd get confused while going to the bathroom (at least I found the right one) and see the beginnings of three different films there. No one noticed or cared and the new theaters, back then, still hadn't developed a matinee audience.

To pay for three movies in the same day on a regular basis is way beyond my budget. And to sit through three sets of TV commercials, shown four-or-five to a clip in an endless loop, and then repeated and repeated, would kill what remains of my brain cells.

Ken
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jdw
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2015 6:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's easy to find crappy reviews.

I can go to Yelp and find them for my theater. Most are about customer service, which *is* poor & slow and one times was quite a bunch of assholes at time that Yohe and I now laugh at. Other complaints are about people talking. We don't run into that much at all... in fact, we're the ones talking through the Trailers and will occasionally get "SHHHHHHHH!!!!" from people who don't understand they're FREAKING TRAILERS~! that the two of us have often seen several times. :) Bathrooms are bathrooms, and you're going to find that in most places: there just are too many people using the head too regularly for it to always be kept perfectly fine. That said, I don't think Steve or I have ever had a bunch of jokes about how bad they are.

On the other hand, the projection and sound have been perfectly fine when we go. I don't recall Steve ever complaining about it, other than getting annoyed when I chose a 3D showing rather than non-3D. I'm sure it happens on occasion, but no where near as often as when we were younger... or even 20 years ago where you'd have Lights Up or Low Sound or Out Of Focus issues in 15%+ of the movies you went to, with someone having to go out to tell the staff.

There's actually a review on Yelp of a special movie that I went to: Celebration Day by Zep. And yes, the person writing the negative review is right: the sound was too low the first song. I don't remember the Lights Up issue, but the sound was too low. Well... several of us went out to point it out. Sure enough, they fixed it... and it seemed like everyone have a freaking great time the remaining 15 of 16 songs. People were clapping, there was fist pumps, there were some "Woooo!" after songs. So the first song was a bit annoying, but the rest rocked the house.
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Ken Viewer



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PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2015 7:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That review I posted also represents my opinion of the theater, which is now the closest to my home.

Your Los Angeles County theaters have the advantage that Hollywoodland is nearby and it's a company town.

As for an adequate number of bathrooms and facilities in these houses, the current Metropolitan Opera House has had that problem in spades, from the day it opened in 1966. The women howled and howled but nothing was done until a few years ago when a token additional bathroom was built at the top of the highest level of seats in the auditorium. That joint seats some 3,800 people and the solution to the lack-of-facilities problem came as a shock to management.

Since they won't let you get back to your seat once the intermissions are over if you didn't leave the bathrooms in time, and the women didn't have time to take care of their needs, attendance dramatically fell off in a matter of only a few years.

There are no more long waits for the ladies. NOT KIDDING. Treat the paying audience like trash for long enough and they'll take their money and walk.

The Met is a ghost town most nights and since the New York City Opera recently went mad and shut down permanently -- with no expected increase in business for the Met -- people found they can live without live opera in Manhattan. This has caused much hair-pulling by boards of directors who can't accept the reality that it's the people's money and they'll spend or not spend it as they please.

And I thought the ghost of Ultra Panavision 70 would return one more time to Manhattan. It's the people's money and they rejected the process at the box office ages ago. My tough luck.

Ken
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Steve Yohe



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PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2015 8:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't have a lot of trouble with Theaters. Can't think of a bad one. If you really want a excellent one, you can drive to the Arclight in Hollywood, if you don't mind paying more. Nothing is like the old 70MM, but on the average, projection is better today. I don't like 3D and IMAX is mostly better sound, but I have no problems.

I haven't been to Westwood or Hollywood Blvd in 20 years or longer. The last time was with John to see one of the Burton Batmans. They used to be the best.

I'm sure the 8 movie will be in 70MM at one or more of the Arclights. Everything they do is the best.

I go out on weekday and to late shows, so it's rare getting stuck in a crowd. I, unless I'm with John, sit down front where others don't like to sit. I don't like being in groups of people & hate kids.

As for three shows in one night, since my retirement....John picks up most of the bills. In Texas while in the Army, I'd pay once & see 5 movies in a day. Now I'm trying to be respectable. I also like the Santa Anita across from John's apartment, because the women look great & I like to stare at them in my old age. They have great looking rich old ones too. Pisses Williams off, but I don't care. He yells at me no matter what I say or do.

The trouble I do have is art films not being shown on the East side of LA. Mexicans don't pay to see them. Movies about gangs & crime & comic books...no problem.---Yohe
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Ken Viewer



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PostPosted: Tue Dec 08, 2015 7:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Last night in Westwood, CA, at the Crest The-a-tour, for a press screening of The Hateful 8," management had to stop the 70 MM film-screening and switch to digital after the projection room refused to play nicely.

This is the second publicly-known shmuck-up at a 70 MM preview of the movie (first one was in Manhattan last week). Either the 70 MM print had a skin infection or the projector (the theater's own) had gate-rot, which is sorta like having large holes in your shirts.

A few attendees tweeted or chirped that the digital version looked better than the film version.

In addition, no one in management knew how to mask the screen to provide a sharp 2.76 to 1 image. They looked at all the the buttons and could not find a setting for Ultra Panavision on account of no one had been born when the last such film was made and released 49 years ago and the button was never developed.

This publicity is priceless for the movie but hell-on-Earth for aficionados of true 70 MM film projection. The next screw-up could be when no one can find the "Emergency Stop" button for a film projector that's been accidentally pointed backward.

Ken
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Steve Yohe



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PostPosted: Wed Dec 09, 2015 4:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

They had to buy special projectors to show the film and now you have to hirer people to run the projection. If I'm a theater owner, I'm going "Why"!

I know I'm not very sophisticated, but I can't (at this time) tell the difference between digital and film. Maybe if some expert pointed things out to me, I might change my opinion, but now I can't see it. I know it's easier to use and handle.---Yohe
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