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5 4 Friday - What music do you have in "heavy rotation&
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tdcheetah



Joined: 27 Jul 2006
Posts: 487
Location: The Cheetah's Lair (aka Clarendon VA)

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 8:02 am    Post subject: 5 4 Friday - What music do you have in "heavy rotation& Reply with quote

Having a 60 gig iPod is popping up a lot of deep cuts from artists, or songs from CDs I never had time to listen to before.

At the same time, I've had to duplicate at least one CD because the old one that played just fine wouldn't rip well to MP3s.

And hey, I'm even slowly starting to consider getting some new music. Just as soon as I finish all the old, right? ;)

Here are 5 songs/albums/artists that are kind of in "heavy rotation" for me right now (8/4/2006). I'm tempted to steal Chuck Klosterman's Jack Factor rating system from _Fargo Rock City_ ("how much would I have to be paid never to listen to this CD again for the rest of my life?"), but that might end up with some insane numbers for Queen's _Night at the Opera_ and all of Joe Jackson.

Basically this is some stuff I like and which hits the spot for me in some really essential way. So recommendations of similar artists/albums/songs are always welcome. :) Mostly I just wanted to talk (and hear, HINT) a little bit about music, and I figure doing only 5 keeps me from running too long in one post [and gives me an out to come back with 5 more later ;)].

================================================
1. Saigon Kick, _Water_. This is the CD I had to replace, because I needed the title track. It's not quite metal, and it's not quite alternative -- frankly, the styles of songs are all over the musical map, as if you took They Might Be Giants and threw them in a blender with some nasty turns of mind ("Sgt. Steve" and "Sentimental Girl" are not exactly family hour). Includes a cover of "Space Oddity" David Bowie would not be ashamed of.

2. The Monkees. They continue to subvert with sweet pop harmonies and lyrics that seem about to break into homicidal mania, except they're just too darn nice to do so. All I've got is a Greatest Hits from 1995, and while the usual suspects include "Last Train To Clarksdale" and the Believer twinset, I often turn back to "Randy Scouse Git" and find myself humming the chorus from "D.W. Washburn".

3. Peter Gabriel, "Steam" / "Only Us" (from _Us_). I came to Gabriel really late [and thank you, guren] and only noticed I was missing this CD when I saw it at a yard sale and asked the iPod if I needed to pick it up. :) The obvious song on this is "Digging in the Dirt", which is a bit of a personal anthem at present :/, but "Steam" is everything I love about Robert Palmer's Riptide/Heavy Nova era packed into one neat little 6 minute song, and then "Only Us" doesn't break the spell but reminds me this is Peter Gabriel's world. Nice stuff.

4. Cher, _Love Hurts_. Sometimes artists do themselves a disservice by using alternative/promotional packaging. I hadn't filed this with my other (Sonny &) Cher items because it came in this big honking balsa wood box with pictures and crap, so it ended up with the boxsets and may not have been played almost since I bought it 15 years ago. But as the follow-up to 1990's _Heart of Stone_, which is still my favorite Cher work, this is the sound of a strong woman struggling with love and loss... and sometimes even the desire to stick your tongue out at someone and say, "So there!"

5. Brian May, _Back to the Light_. Brian's first post-Queen effort. I often forget about this album for periods of time, but when I'm hurting, I pull it out and it tends to save my life with its acknowledgement that life is deep, mysterious, simple, scary, sad... and full of whatever you're looking for.

===============================================
So what 5 things are you listening to the most?


Lee (whose AC has to be completely replaced -- and not until Monday. Ow.)
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Frank_Jewett
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seems like a conspiracy is pushing me toward seventies music lately.

I happened to catch "The Full Monty" on IFC a few days ago, so I've been listening to "I Believe In Miracles" by Hot Chocolate. I love the seventies fuzz tone guitar in "Miracles" and "Every 1's A Winner." Nick Gilder's "Hot Child In The City" had the same sound.

I've quickly gotten hooked on "Life on Mars" which is currently airing on Monday nights and replaying on Sunday nights on BBC America. The title song by David Bowie is one I need to pick up. The song blaring over all the teasers is "Ballroom Blitz" by the Sweet. Other songs from the first two episodes have included "Baba O'Riley" by the Who and "Live And Let Die" by Wings. I don't recall the seventies being quite so bleak, but then I wasn't a cop in Manchester. Police veterans who have been interviewed have said that if anything, the drinking (on the job) and violence are understated. Yikes!

Elton John defines the heavy rotation in my car stereo. Current favorites are "Rocket Man", "Don't Let The Sun Go Down On Me", and "Philadelphia Freedom." The latter has to be one of the quintessential seventies pop rock songs with electric piano, synthesizers, and violins along with Davey Johnstone's competent but unambitious power chords. Come to think of it, "Freedom" could easily have been penned by ubiquitous seventies composer Mike Post as the theme for a TV show.

Frank
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dewelar



Joined: 01 Aug 2006
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 12:59 pm    Post subject: Proulx Music Reply with quote

Here's some stuff I've been listening to a lot lately...

1. Springsteen: The Seeger Sessions

2. Doug & the Slugs: Cognac & Bologna/Wrap It - Extremely underrated Canadian pop that never leaves my CD changer.

3: Doug Kershaw: Louisiana Man - this guy's catalog was *finally* released on CD recently, and I couldn't be happier.

4: Baseball's Greatest Hits I & II - always in my player during baseball season.

5: Entrain: No Matter What - fun semi-local music

Always good to see someone who appreciates the Monkees. I have their entire catalog on CD (well, except for some of the greatest hits collections that got released with one or two rarities -- one of my pet peeves about the music industry), and I can honestly recommend about 80% of it. Even lousy albums like "Changes" and "Pool It" have a few gems. "Randy Scouse Git" has always been one of my favorite tracks of theirs, although I still tend to favor "Goin' Down" as my absolute favorte Monkees track. Many moons ago, Nesmith was my favorite Monkee, but over the years I've grown to appreciate the goofiness and energy of Micky Dolenz. Overall, the Monkees' body of work is surprisingly stong for a band most folks dismiss as bubblegum.

John Proulx
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Frank_Jewett
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 1:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Folks dismiss the Monkees because their songs were written by Brill Building stalwarts like Neil Diamond, Burt Bacharach, Carole King, and Gerry Goffin while much of their music was produced by session musicians and songwriting duo Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart. I like the Monkees music, but only part of the credit goes to the foursome who played the Monkees on TV. The Monkees themselves realized this and Davy Jones and Mickey Dolenz later toured with Boyce and Hart playing Monkees songs.

Frank
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Scott



Joined: 31 Jul 2006
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 10:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Since I don't have an IPod (or any type of portable mp3 player for that matter), I'll just list my top 5 albums for home/work listening currently. BTW, if I were in the market for a portable mp3 player in the next month or two, what would y'all recommend?

I'm a bit of a guitar nerd myself, even though I don't play nearly as much as I want to. Maybe after school starts and stuff calms down, I'll be home enough to actually practice.

Ok, back to the topic at hand...

1) Steely Dan's "A Decade Of Steely Dan": Kid Charlemagne, My Old School, Reeling In The Years, Bodhissatva (sp?). A little bit of jazz rock listening. My favorite song on the album is Kid Charlemagne, with Larry Carlton on guitar. Mmm mmm good.

2) Son Seals "Deluxe Edition": Funky Bitch, Hot Sauce, Telephone Angel. It's not that I don't like B.B., but I find myself listening to Son more. In particular, Funky Bitch is one of my new all-time favorite blues songs.

3) The Outlaws "Green Grass and High Tides": The title track (which is to The Outlaws as Freebird is to Skynyrd, but you don't hear it on the radio ten times a day), Stick Around For Rock and Roll, Freeborn Man. These guys are your basic 70s southern rock band, except they wander towards a country sound more, with several of their songs having quite the country twang on guitar. There's more good listening than just the three songs I mentioned, but those stick out. Their instrumental "Waterhole" makes me envision Dukes of Hazzard car chases when I listen to it (no lie!)

4) Rush "Hold Your Fire": Prime Mover, Lock And Key, Force Ten. I tend to rotate through Rush albums regularly, I'm usually always listening to one, it's this album's turn now.

5) AC/DC "Flick of the Switch": House Is On Fire, Guns For Hire, Badlands. People bust on this album, but I don't think it's all that bad. Granted, it's not one of their best ones, but I do like the first two songs I mentioned a lot. And as far as AC/DC albums, "Fly On the Wall" was a lot worse.

Some individual songs by Al DiMeola (The Wizard and Race With The Devil On A Spanish Highway), Hank Garland and the Sugar Footers (Sugarfoot Rag), Robben Ford (his Line 6 version of Help The Poor), Larry Carlton's Room 335, Charlie Christian's Solo Flight. My next round at Amazon will probably have me branching out away from guitars a bit, I have some Afrika Bambataa on the shopping list (I don't care what anybody says, I still think Planet Rock kicks ass), Bob Seger, etc. Not quite as much guitar in the next Amazon batch.

Scott
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dewelar



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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 11:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Frank_Jewett wrote:
Folks dismiss the Monkees because their songs were written by Brill Building stalwarts like Neil Diamond, Burt Bacharach, Carole King, and Gerry Goffin while much of their music was produced by session musicians and songwriting duo Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart. I like the Monkees music, but only part of the credit goes to the foursome who played the Monkees on TV. The Monkees themselves realized this and Davy Jones and Mickey Dolenz later toured with Boyce and Hart playing Monkees songs.


Yes and no. Dolenz and Jones realized this, yes, but Nesmith and Tork always bristled at not being allowed to write their own music or play their own instruments. Even on the early albums, you'd find tunes penned by Nesmith or, more occasionally, Tork (who REALLY didn't like being stuck doing the comedy stuff like "Your Auntie Grizelda"). That began to change on their 3rd album, "Headquarters", on which the Monkees played most, if not all, of the instruments. The 4th album, "Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones, Ltd.", was a mixture of the Monkees themselves playing and writing, together with outside folks, and I think it's their best overall work.

The main problem was that the studio wanted pop, while Nesmith and Tork wanted to do more folk-country stuff. That, and Don Kirshner's ego that wouldn't allow him to let go. From the 5th album ("The Birds, The Bees, and the Monkees") on, the best songs were those provided by those two. They just weren't pop, and they weren't hits (the very mediocre "Valleri" notwithstanding), so people ignore them.
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tdcheetah



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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 2:19 pm    Post subject: Re: Proulx Music Reply with quote

dewelar wrote:
Here's some stuff I've been listening to a lot lately...

1. Springsteen: The Seeger Sessions


Err... sorry, no. :) It's bad enough I finally own a Bob Dylan disc (granted, it's _Love and Theft_, which I've been told is not typical Dylan), but you'll have to talk to the other Boss fans on the board. Ain't going for it. :)

Quote:
2. Doug & the Slugs: Cognac & Bologna/Wrap It - Extremely underrated Canadian pop that never leaves my CD changer.


Interesting. Listened to a random sample of the songs on Amazon, not sure if they'd grow on me or not.

Quote:
3: Doug Kershaw: Louisiana Man - this guy's catalog was *finally* released on CD recently, and I couldn't be happier.


Hmm, don't have much Cajun music, though what I've heard I've liked.

Quote:
Always good to see someone who appreciates the Monkees. I have their entire catalog on CD (well, except for some of the greatest hits collections that got released with one or two rarities -- one of my pet peeves about the music industry), and I can honestly recommend about 80% of it. Even lousy albums like "Changes" and "Pool It" have a few gems. "Randy Scouse Git" has always been one of my favorite tracks of theirs, although I still tend to favor "Goin' Down" as my absolute favorte Monkees track.


Oh yeah, "Goin' Down" is very cool too. Suggest one CD as a starter for someone who only has a mediocre Greatest Hits comp? :)

Quote:
Many moons ago, Nesmith was my favorite Monkee, but over the years I've grown to appreciate the goofiness and energy of Micky Dolenz.


Ha! That's kind of my same order of preference. Nesmith just always looked like he was more grounded in reality than the others... I know Davy was supposed to be the cute teen idol, but I wasn't quite old enough -- I had people like Shaun Cassidy and Leif Garrett for that. ;)


Lee (who does *not* own any Shaun or Leif music in any format whatsoever. Am considering getting a Bay City Rollers Greatest Hits, tho.)
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tdcheetah



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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 2:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Frank_Jewett wrote:
Seems like a conspiracy is pushing me toward seventies music lately.


Nostalgia for a simpler time? ;)

Quote:
I happened to catch "The Full Monty" on IFC a few days ago, so I've been listening to "I Believe In Miracles" by Hot Chocolate. I love the seventies fuzz tone guitar in "Miracles" and "Every 1's A Winner." Nick Gilder's "Hot Child In The City" had the same sound.


I believe in... aah! Earworm! Earworm! :)

Quote:
I've quickly gotten hooked on "Life on Mars" which is currently airing on Monday nights and replaying on Sunday nights on BBC America. The title song by David Bowie is one I need to pick up.


Ooh, nice authentic Bowie voice on that one. Right now my fave Bowie cuts are off of _Diamond Dogs_ (title track, "Future Legend", "Candidate", "Chant...") and _Aladdin Sane_ ("Panic in Detroit", "Cracked Actor", "Time"). Though really, that whole 70-75 era is unbelievably good work. Well, except for him doing stupid things like covering "Across the Universe" and "Let's Spend the Night Together". *rolls eyes* Some kind of toxic contamination anytime Bowie gets involved with another artist -- other than Queen who are very much on the same musical page with him.

Quote:
The song blaring over all the teasers is "Ballroom Blitz" by the Sweet.


I completely, utterly, totally adore that song and am eternally grateful to _Wayne's World_ for putting it back on the map.

Quote:
Elton John defines the heavy rotation in my car stereo. Current favorites are "Rocket Man", "Don't Let The Sun Go Down On Me", and "Philadelphia Freedom." The latter has to be one of the quintessential seventies pop rock songs with electric piano, synthesizers, and violins along with Davey Johnstone's competent but unambitious power chords. Come to think of it, "Freedom" could easily have been penned by ubiquitous seventies composer Mike Post as the theme for a TV show.


A show about cops in '70s Philadelphia, maybe? *laugh* PF is probably one of my least favorite Elton songs that I still don't mind hearing. I do like a bunch of his '70s stuff (and _Rock of the Westies_ is much better than I remember it) but my strongest love album-wise probably lies with 1983's _Too Low for Zero_ and 1988's _Reg Strikes Back_.

Oddly enough, I hated one of the albums released between those two so much, I sold it back soon after buying it. I don't often do that, but it was terrible. it was probably _Leather Jackets_, as I remember I almost didn't buy _Reg Strikes Back_ until its monster hit came out all over MTV. :)

But if you don't have his 1987 _Live in Australia..._, it's just 100% awesome presentation of some of his 70s songs. Maybe a better album with symphony orchestra even than the Scorps one. ;)


Lee (who bought _Peachtree Road_ and liked two songs off it so far, which is below par, but maybe it will grow on me)
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Tim Livingston



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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 3:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been listening to hip-hop, but knowing this crowd, I'm sure that would get x-nayed pretty quickly. :)

But outside of that, here's what I got:

1) Stadium Arcadium - RHCP: Fun, summer album that's a good thing to just sit in the car and bob your head to sometimes. In fact, the title track is the song that I'm really digging right now.

2) The Beach Boys: Mostly "Pet Sounds," which is superb, but their old stuff are summer songs that are always good to listen to when the weather is sunny. Makes me want to go to the beach. :)

3) The Darkness: Because of my fandom of Queen, this is almost a no-brainer. It's funny, though. Outside of a couple songs, they don't sound too much like Queen. Fun stuff, and "Blind Man" is a song that gets me every time.

4) Bowie: Backing Cheetah's post, I just put "Life On Mars" as my ringtone for my cell phone. So there. :) I can't believe it has taken me this long to get into Bowie considering my love for english pop, but thanks to my old roommate and "A Life Aquatic" (Foreign versions of "Mars" anybody?) Bowie has made a splash in my musical library.

5) Flogging Molly: They just released a new album called "Whiskey on a Sunday" with a new song and a bunch of b-sides: 4 acoustics and 5 live versions. Because of that, I went back and listened to the older songs they remade to compare and contrast, and some of the new stuff really stands out.
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Frank_Jewett
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 4:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tdcheetah wrote:
Frank_Jewett wrote:
Seems like a conspiracy is pushing me toward seventies music lately.


Nostalgia for a simpler time? ;)


I grew up in the seventies. Not much to be nostalgic about other than Bill King doing play-by-play for the Raiders and Warriors. It's amazing how many more choices we have now in terms of media, software, shopping, entertainment, and information. The best part is that now if I went back to a rural setting like Portland, I could still engage the world at a global pace, though the humidity and shopping at Sam's Club would both drive me nuts!

Frank
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tdcheetah



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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 11:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tim Livingston wrote:
I've been listening to hip-hop, but knowing this crowd, I'm sure that would get x-nayed pretty quickly. :)


Not necessarily. I actually listen to quite a wide range of stuff, as anyone who's started looking at my idiosyncratic CD categorization scheme would tell you. :) My roots are pretty clearly in 60's-pop-psychedica-70s-prog rock-heavy metal-80s-New Wave, but I've got bluegrass, trance, qawwali, electronica, celtic, show tunes, opera...

I do feel like I don't really understand rap as "music". I have this odd, perhaps old-fashioned idea that musicians who are acting as vocalists should, well, at least try to sing. [Which means William Shatner is a novelty vocal act but not a vocalist, much less a musician. :)]

At the same time, I did hear the Prologue to the Canterbury Tales done live as a rap song once, and it was rhythmically awesome. So, maybe I just need more education or exposure to some really good rap? Ditto for hip-hop. I mean, I see articles online that rap is a form of hip hop, that hip hop is a form of rap, that one is a culture while the other is a musical style... well, that's just as confusing to me as when I started trying to figure out techno, trance, EBM, IDM, etc. And despite some wonderful early guidance from CRZ and multiple consultations of Ishtar's Guide to Electronic Music at di.fm, I'm *still* not at all sure I understand all those picky little subgenres - but the key is still the simple art of asking questions and listening - finding an artist you like, then finding more artists like that whom you also like. Easy as pie, right? ;)

Quote:
1) Stadium Arcadium - RHCP: Fun, summer album that's a good thing to just sit in the car and bob your head to sometimes. In fact, the title track is the song that I'm really digging right now.


Ok, this is one of those bands I've avoided hard because I disliked so much of "alternative music" in the 80s that it stopped me listening to radio entirely for years. :( Random listens from Amazon samples aren't making me change my mind at the moment - some of the uptempo stuff sounds all right but isn't grabbing me, while the slow stuff uniformly makes me want to put on some Iron Maiden to wash the taste out of my ears. :)

Quote:
2) The Beach Boys: Mostly "Pet Sounds," which is superb, but their old stuff are summer songs that are always good to listen to when the weather is sunny. Makes me want to go to the beach. :)


I actually don't own any Beach Boys. I like some of their songs and harmonies well enough, but never felt compelled to actively buy anything by them.

Quote:
3) The Darkness: Because of my fandom of Queen, this is almost a no-brainer. It's funny, though. Outside of a couple songs, they don't sound too much like Queen. Fun stuff, and "Blind Man" is a song that gets me every time.


OMG, I'm not the only one who doesn't hear it!

I too am a major Queen fangirl [as a poor college student, I got _Opera_ and _Races_ as Japanese import CDs because their back catalogue was *so* long in coming out and I only had access to a CD player]. But this band utterly scared me: I couldn't tell whether I should buy their stuff or not!

Don't know whether I subconsciously don't want anyone else to sound like Queen or what, but from what few bits I'd heard off the first album, I'd certainly agree that they didn't sound like Queen to me either. Queen's harmonies seem so much tighter for one thing -- and just because someone can sing falsetto at high speed and/or parade around in public spandex does NOT make him Freddie Mercury.

As your comment made me think maybe I wasn't just being reactionarily nutso in not seeing an amazing strong resemblance to the Q4 :) , I went to Amazon and read some reviews of both The Darkness albums, plus listened to all the samples from the discs.

Well, even though they nabbed Queen's producer and I can hear some Q-echoes in the second album, I still think Sweet and T-Rex are far more apt comparisons. Since I also like Sweet a lot, I feel a lot more confident that I would like at least the second album. So you've made a sale on that one. :)

Quote:
4) Bowie: Backing Cheetah's post, I just put "Life On Mars" as my ringtone for my cell phone. So there. :) I can't believe it has taken me this long to get into Bowie considering my love for english pop, but thanks to my old roommate and "A Life Aquatic" (Foreign versions of "Mars" anybody?) Bowie has made a splash in my musical library.


It's funny, the avoidance we may sometimes do of some artists who are, or who seem, very similar in style to ones we already love. I covet the lyrical mastery of Joe Jackson, but I didn't like [read, "didn't want to like"] Elvis Costello. Someone finally snuck me into him via a subtle segue through Nick Lowe [British] and Warren Zevon [snarky singer/songwriter].

It would be very hard for me to pick my single favorite Bowie song. If you press me, "Suffragette City" is probably it, because it's the song I always wanted to close my concert with if I became a rock star, but that leaves out "Heroes" and "Fashion" and "Young Americans" and "Golden Years" and "Rebel Rebel" and "Let's Dance" and "John I'm Only Dancing" and...

... well, you get the picture.

Quote:
5) Flogging Molly: They just released a new album called "Whiskey on a Sunday" with a new song and a bunch of b-sides: 4 acoustics and 5 live versions. Because of that, I went back and listened to the older songs they remade to compare and contrast, and some of the new stuff really stands out.


I've heard the band name but had no clue what type(s) of music they did. Irish with a serious punk edge - oh yeah, this is great stuff. Time to clear some room on the shelves between Boiled in Lead and Tempest...

Thanks, Tim. 2 out of 5 ain't bad. ;)


Lee (who doesn't believe in a Queen without Freddie and
so refuses to believe in "Queen + Paul Rodgers", but does
enjoy Brian working with Meat Loaf on a Steinman song)
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Tim Livingston



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PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2006 12:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tdcheetah wrote:

Thanks, Tim. 2 out of 5 ain't bad. ;)


I do my best. :)

Should have added that I had such a recent hankering for Pink Floyd that I put on "Wish You Were Here" and just got entranced by it. 1975 was a great year for music: That album and "A Night At The Opera." Unbelievable. That album is quite possibly the best Pink album. Same structure as "Dark Side" but the content is so above and beyond it that to me it just doesn't seem fair. What a moving message to Barrett, and the title song is by far my favorite Pink Floyd song ever. Makes me wish I did this list tonight instead. :)


Quote:
Lee (who doesn't believe in a Queen without Freddie and
so refuses to believe in "Queen + Paul Rodgers", but does
enjoy Brian working with Meat Loaf on a Steinman song)


Damn right. :)
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RL



Joined: 01 Aug 2006
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Location: Atlanta

PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2006 11:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

1. Tool - Right in Two

2. Tool - Rosetta Stoned

3. Tool - Vicarious

4. Tool - Jambi

5. Tool - 10,000 Days/Wings for Marie

Yeah, I'm not exactly braching out a lot right now -- or even switching albums all that much. Though there are odd breaks here and there for Meshuggah, Peter Gabriel and Nina Nastasia.

~rl
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Fong



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PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2006 2:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tdcheetah wrote:
dewelar wrote:
Here's some stuff I've been listening to a lot lately...

1. Springsteen: The Seeger Sessions


Err... sorry, no. :) It's bad enough I finally own a Bob Dylan disc (granted, it's _Love and Theft_, which I've been told is not typical Dylan), but you'll have to talk to the other Boss fans on the board. Ain't going for it. :)



Well... this Boss fan ain't really goin' for it either. I like the idea behind it, and it's listenable enough, but it hasn't spent more than a a couple hours in my player since it was released. Devils & Dust didn't spend a lot of time in there either, save for "Long Time Comin'". The Born To Run re-release, however... yowza.

Anyway, the stuff in my car right now (where I do most of my real listening, because the Metallica on my iPod when I lift or run doesn't really count):

1. Who's Next. I didn't bother buying this until two weeks ago, because the big three (Baba, Blue Eyes, Won't Get Fooled) are on radio constantly. Having now heard Love Ain't For Keepin' for the first time, I realized not buying this record sooner was my loss.

2. Metallica live in Berlin, June 4 2006. The opportunity to hear the Master of Puppets album played in its entirety sounded like a great idea. Too bad Lars simply cannot play in time anymore. Just can't. And they debut a song that features five different "chunks" ranging in quality from vintage Metallica to amateur hour.

3. Johnny Cash - American V. I posted a few thoughts about this at the former site, but this record gets more and more spooky and engrossing with every listen.

4. Elvis Costello - Armed Forces. A few hardcore Elvis fans tell me this one pales in comparison to This Year's Model. Haven't heard that one yet, but this record is really enjoyable.

I don't think there is a fifth on the list right now. Which is sad, because summertime is always the time for me to really branch out and try listening to new stuff. Hopefully, there's enough time left to find something good...

-HJF
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Jeremy Billones



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PostPosted: Mon Aug 07, 2006 10:19 am    Post subject: I miss the New Messages board Reply with quote

I also can't believe it's 2006 and software is still sending passwords by email in clear text :p

Anyway, I just got back from vacation and Ted Racier had brought two CDs of war movie soundtracks to listen to on the trip. After I dropped him off back in NY and reloaded my player, this is what's in it:

1) Berlin - Greatest Hits

"No More Words" was a song from the Solid Gold era that I remembered, so in the early 90s when I was in college and decided to shift from tapes to CDs I went the Columbia House route and this was one of the early CDs I picked up. Their most famous song is one I hate -- "Take My Breath Away" from the Top Gun soundtrack -- but I can just skip over it and the rest of the album is solid. When I get my new computer and a CD-R that works I'm going to rip and reburn the album without it :)

2) Evanescence - Anywhere But Home

I'm not a fan of live albums in general -- mosts groups I've heard live let the music dominate the vocals so you can't make out the lyrics -- but their cover of "Thoughtless" makes this a no-brainer. The original by Korn is your usual metal too-damn-much-thrash-guitar song, but their version drops one of the guitars for piano and that brings a terrific balance to the strings without losing any of the power. (Then again, I'm a sucker for a rock song with a piano in it. Or violins. Or anything but another guitar, actually.)

3) Roxette - Don't Bore Us, Get To The Chorus

One of several "greatest hits" albums; I forget the chronology. My favorite Roxette song was never a single ("Soul Deep"), but I've got their re-release of "Pearls Of Passion" by my DVD player so that's covered.

4) Groove Coverage - Greatest Hits

A misnomer, since this is their only US album :) A German euro-trance band. I heard their cover of Alice Cooper's "Poison" and decided to take a chance on the album when I finally found it in a Best Buy. It's OK; I couldn't tell you the difference between good euro-trance and bad euro-trance, but it didn't make me hit the eject button on the CD player.

5) New Order - Waiting for the Sirens' Call

Their 2005 album. I actually like their work with Gillian Gilbert more than without her; they're even farther from their Joy Division days, and while I like NO more than JD they do have a unique style that seems a bit less so. Then again, it has been 25 years since Movement so complaining about a change seems monumentally stupid :) I'll probably swap this with either Substance Disc 1 or Retro Disc 1 when I get around to it.

6) Kelly Clarkson - Breakway

Yeah, bite me :) When I heard she won two Grammys (Best Album, and Best Song for "Since U Been Gone") I decided to get over the American Idol business and give her second album a shot. (The first one blows, BTW.) A lot of good power-pop, with stuff written by Avril Lavigne and the guys from Evanescence. She wants to be Aretha Franklin when she grows up, but has the pipes to tide her over 'til she gets there. Ended up going to see her in concert last month, where she outsang the band so she's aces in my book.
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