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5 4 Friday - What music do you have in "heavy rotation&
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tdcheetah



Joined: 27 Jul 2006
Posts: 487
Location: The Cheetah's Lair (aka Clarendon VA)

PostPosted: Tue Aug 08, 2006 3:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Howdy! This is official notice that I have not been ignoring your post or you, but going this last week without AC made any extended stints sitting at the computer rather exhausting. There were moments I thought my brain had melted (or at least half-drowned from all the water in the air).

Scott wrote:
Since I don't have an IPod (or any type of portable mp3 player for that matter), I'll just list my top 5 albums for home/work listening currently. BTW, if I were in the market for a portable mp3 player in the next month or two, what would y'all recommend?


Well, I know one person who's had 5 of the HP "iPod clones", and all have gone under during the warranty period.

I love the size of the 60 GB iPod (though of course I wish it was bigger, as I'm up to 80+ GB of MP3 with shelves to go yet...). The interface and software on the iPod itself is okay, but the way iTunes is built to function (or in some cases, built NOT to function) is rapidly starting to piss me off. Grrr. :)

You can set up iTunes to rip plain MP3s rather than Apple's proprietary AAC format, but I've been using something called "Exact Audio Copy" because it can do Variable Bit Rate [i.e., compresses more where less sound is going on = smaller file sizes. I'm all about balancing audio quality with the ability to get a few more songs on the Pod :) ]

Quote:
1) Steely Dan's "A Decade Of Steely Dan": Kid Charlemagne, My Old School, Reeling In The Years, Bodhissatva (sp?). A little bit of jazz rock listening. My favorite song on the album is Kid Charlemagne, with Larry Carlton on guitar. Mmm mmm good.


I loved enough deep cuts from Steely Dan that I got both _Can't Buy A Thrill_ ("Dirty Work", "Kings", "Only a Fool Would Say That") and _Katy Lied_ ("Black Friday", "Doctor Wu", "Everyone's Gone To The Movies") ages ago. Picked up _Royal Scam_ more recently; not as enamored of it.

The live "Bodhisattva" from _Alive in America_ is Awesome. If you like the studio one, you *want* this. :) _AiA_ also has a "Kid Charlemagne", but I'm not sure that it's that much better than the album version... does have some pretty cool additional instrumentation and er, alternate singing styles for "Reelin' in the Years", though.

Have you ever listened to any of Fagen's solo stuff? I'm crazy about _Nightfly_: even that stupid "I.G.Y." song gets some play, but the whole of what was probably "Side 2" on the original album [ok, I actually miss the days when "sides" of album affected the order and placement of songs...] from "New Frontier" through "Walk Between the Raindrops" is terrific. However, _Morph the Cat_ hasn't done anything for me.

Quote:
2) Son Seals "Deluxe Edition": Funky Bitch, Hot Sauce, Telephone Angel. It's not that I don't like B.B., but I find myself listening to Son more. In particular, Funky Bitch is one of my new all-time favorite blues songs.


Hmm, that's some nice guitar sound there. Gotta put this on a blues list...

Quote:
3) The Outlaws "Green Grass and High Tides": The title track (which is to The Outlaws as Freebird is to Skynyrd, but you don't hear it on the radio ten times a day), Stick Around For Rock and Roll, Freeborn Man. These guys are your basic 70s southern rock band, except they wander towards a country sound more, with several of their songs having quite the country twang on guitar. There's more good listening than just the three songs I mentioned, but those stick out. Their instrumental "Waterhole" makes me envision Dukes of Hazzard car chases when I listen to it (no lie!)


Wow, that initial review at Amazon is pretty good... in not putting the album over, that is. Normally I'll discount the "official Amazon review" a bit for a mildly positively bias [aka "listen, we wanna move this product"] - so on that scale, that review is downright savage!

I did like what I could hear of "Freeborn Man" and "Hurry Sundown". Not as excited by some of the slower stuff, but then that's typical with me. :)

Quote:
4) Rush "Hold Your Fire": Prime Mover, Lock And Key, Force Ten. I tend to rotate through Rush albums regularly, I'm usually always listening to one, it's this album's turn now.


And I just caught the lovely "Tai Shan" off that one, which of course *would* have to be an instant exception to my comment about slower stuff immediately above. :)

I have a distinct fondness for _Roll the Bones_ partly because it was the first Rush work I was able to hear in its entirety, rather than just catching the (dreadfully overplayed) greatest hits randomly on the radio.

Quote:
5) AC/DC "Flick of the Switch": House Is On Fire, Guns For Hire, Badlands. People bust on this album, but I don't think it's all that bad. Granted, it's not one of their best ones, but I do like the first two songs I mentioned a lot. And as far as AC/DC albums, "Fly On the Wall" was a lot worse.


Doesn't sound too bad, or too much different than what AC/DC I already have... so on the list, but not very high on the list. :)

Quote:
I have some Afrika Bambataa on the shopping list (I don't care what anybody says, I still think Planet Rock kicks ass)


Hmm, here I didn't think I'd ever heard anything by Afrika Bambataa, but I do recognize at least two tracks off of the 1980-85 comp -- I just never knew who the artist was. So let me know what you think about what you get, and I may put it high up on the list.

Quote:
Bob Seger


Can't speak at all on his studio stuff, but if you like his music at all I can highly recommend both _Live Bullet_ and _Nine Tonight_ as tremendous representations of Seger live.

"If I ever get out of here
If I ever get out of here
If I ever get out of here --
I'm going to Katmandu."


Lee (hey, some people just sound so much better live
than in the studio... and some sound much the same.
Which sameness may, or may not, be a good thing.)
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cNJ Chris



Joined: 27 Jul 2006
Posts: 11

PostPosted: Tue Aug 08, 2006 6:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Frank_Jewett wrote:
Elton John defines the heavy rotation in my car stereo. Current favorites are "Rocket Man", "Don't Let The Sun Go Down On Me", and "Philadelphia Freedom." The latter has to be one of the quintessential seventies pop rock songs with electric piano, synthesizers, and violins along with Davey Johnstone's competent but unambitious power chords. Come to think of it, "Freedom" could easily have been penned by ubiquitous seventies composer Mike Post as the theme for a TV show.


Elton's actually spent a good deal of time in my iPod lately. I'm not a big fan of listening to singles, being that I've heard them so many times on commercial radio, I can go without hearing many classic songs for the rest of my life (see: Baba O'Riley). Elton, especially on his early albums, wrote some terrific album songs that anyone else would've wished could be their singles. Tumbleweed Connection is my favorite Elton album (and one of my favorite albums of all time) and the track I've been listening to the most from it is My Father's Gun. Thematically, it's like The Band's "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down", as it's told from the point of view of a Confederate soldier, but the coda is what really hits me hard. It rivals Hey Jude in its energy and anthemic spark, with some outstanding background vocals from a group that includes Dusty Springfield.

I've also been listening to a lot of Gordon Lightfoot (I'm really into his major --> minor 7th chord changes on songs like Nous Vivons Ensemble and Restless and his major 7th chords on Beautiful, which are very hard to make sound right in a song, but work great alongside the touching lyrics); Little Feat (Lowell George is another guy who, on the early records, came up with some very idiosyncratic chord progressions, like the E to C on Strawberry Flats); Dave Mason (the first solo album from the ex-Traffic member has some lovely open tuned guitar parts, especially on Only You Know and I Know, which he brought to Delaney and Bonnie, and Can't Stop Loving, Can't Stop Worrying), Fairport Convention (Richard Thompson's band, the first record's It's Alright Ma (It's Only Witchcraft) and its perfect covers of Dylan, Joni Mitchell, and The Merry-Go-Round match well); and Blind Willie McTell (Statesboro Blues has an amazing fingerpicking pattern, plus he's my favorite vocalist of the old Piedmont blues musicians.)

Hey Cheetah, ever heard Jellyfish? If you're into Queen, you'd probably like them. One of the best bands of the 90's that no one remembers, they have great multi-part harmonies and complex arrangements to go with some really choice songs.
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CFTV



Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 284

PostPosted: Tue Aug 08, 2006 6:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I went to see String Cheese out at Red Rocks the weekend before the 4th of July and they totally blew me away. My main purpose to go out there was to see Bob Weir's band Ratdog open for Cheese. Cheese is from Denver and Red Rocks is their hometown venue. Plus their music is more intenese than what Ratdog does they lend themselves to closing than what Bobby is doing.

Cheese mixed it up with funk, blues, bluegrass, and techno music. The 2nd and final night of the weekend was out of this world. The Best Feeling is one of my fave tunes and is sang perfectly by Michael Kang who is the funkiest asian man in capri pants ever. SOTOTW was some grassy fun. Then the band Taj Mahal came on and they did a bit of blues. The Shining Star was the tune that ABC used for their NBA Coverage back a couple seasons ago. Not to be confused with the cover tune Jer used to kill on back when he was touring with JGB.

The second set was out of this world. Bobby Weir joined the band for a spirited GDTRFB. I wish Bob would have done more than 1 tune a night with the Cheese Boys but it wasn't to be. The night before they encored with I Know You Rider which was good but suffered from having like 11 people playing instrauments over each other.

Smile is such a good tune and it does bring a smile to my face. The Eye Know Why got really out there and trancy. I perfer Cheese doing the techno trance thing to their bluegrass stuff but that is me and I know a ton of people that think the bluegrass stuff is where its at for Cheese. The Rivertrance was totally amazing. It was like Mother Nature and Cheese cosmically had a mindmelt because as they were getting Rivertrance going (Think Riverdance done jamband style) a really light misting of rain came over us in the Colorado Mountains. Talk about a total rush. The rain was really light and was pretty much over when they left the stage. It was an experience that I will always remember vividly.

The first encore was a tune that Kang picked up on a trip to Africa called Tamba. This tune totally moved me. Such a wonderful tune. They finished up the run with a crowd fave in Black Cloud.

Here is where you can listen to the show I am talking about: http://www.archive.org/stream/sci20....flac16_vbr.m3u

07/02/06 (Sun) Red Rocks Amphitheatre - Morrison, CO

Set 1: Outside And Inside > Best Feeling > Sittin' On Top Of The World, Mailbox Blues^^, Stagger Lee^^, Piece of Mine, Black & White^, Search^, Shining Star^

Set 2: Going Down The Road Feeling Bad#, It Is What It Is, Sometimes A River, Smile, Eye Know Why^, Rivertrance E: Tamba^, Black Cloud


I also have been listening to a lot of Michael Franti and Spearhead. Such great lyrics and is a poet. I love his tunes. There is a ton of his stuff on http://www.archive.org

Of course I still love seeing and collecting Bobby Weir shows. Later this month I am going up to Baltimore to see him for a 2 night run at Ramshead Live right in Downtown Baltimore. For a 59 year old man he still puts on a great show and I have never walked out disapointed after like 34 times I have seen his band Ratdog. Bobby's sound is much more condusivie to playing Clubs and Theatres than it does Ampitheatres. The Baltmore Shows should be off the hook!

Also I have to give props to Phil Lesh and Friends. I caught them for 2 nights when they came through Florida in June and they were really good. I love the additon of Joan Osborne especially over his recent friends in Ryan Adams and Chris Robinson. I like Robinson but I enjoy Joan more. I rather have Warren Haynes over Chris as well. The less said about Adams the better because I just don't enjoy his singing on Dead tunes. Ryan writes great songs but I really don't need to hear him sing them. That being said Joan nailed Nobody's Girl perfectly and it was probably the highlight of the Tampa show I saw.

So yeah the more things change like the board, the more things stay the same me listening to Jamband Music. :P
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tdcheetah



Joined: 27 Jul 2006
Posts: 487
Location: The Cheetah's Lair (aka Clarendon VA)

PostPosted: Tue Aug 08, 2006 10:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cNJ Chris wrote:
Elton's actually spent a good deal of time in my iPod lately. I'm not a big fan of listening to singles, being that I've heard them so many times on commercial radio, I can go without hearing many classic songs for the rest of my life (see: Baba O'Riley).


Yeah, there's a song ;) I call "Sweet Stairway to Hotel Freebird" which I would more than happily never hear again...

Quote:
Elton, especially on his early albums, wrote some terrific album songs that anyone else would've wished could be their singles.


No kidding. Like "Sixty Years On" off of _Elton John_, or about a third of _Goodbye Yellow Brick Road_. [In looking up Elton's actual singles just now, I never realized "Levon" and "Tiny Dancer" were so early! Shows you how Greatest Hits comps can seriously warp your view of reality. :) ]

Quote:
Tumbleweed Connection is my favorite Elton album (and one of my favorite albums of all time) and the track I've been listening to the most from it is My Father's Gun. Thematically, it's like The Band's "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down", as it's told from the point of view of a Confederate soldier, but the coda is what really hits me hard. It rivals Hey Jude in its energy and anthemic spark, with some outstanding background vocals from a group that includes Dusty Springfield.


I don't have _Tumbleweed_ yet.

My surprise historical song right now is Steve Earle's "Dixieland" -- I've been doing a bunch of Civil War research recently, and all of a sudden "20th Maine" and "Colonel Joshua Chamberlain" register in my ears! :)

Quote:
I've also been listening to a lot of Gordon Lightfoot (I'm really into his major --> minor 7th chord changes on songs like Nous Vivons Ensemble and Restless and his major 7th chords on Beautiful, which are very hard to make sound right in a song, but work great alongside the touching lyrics);


Ah, "Sundown" is one of the very first songs I remember loving so much I looked forward to hearing it on the radio. I have _Gord's Gold_ and a live CD, but the only one of the 3 songs you mention that I have is "Beautiful", which does sound pretty good...

However, this just got me to listen to the live version of "Pussy Willows, Cat-Tails" for the first time, and I am a *major* sucker for songs that come to a complete stop at some point during the song. So, maybe I need a slightly better hits comp? :)

Quote:
Little Feat (Lowell George is another guy who, on the early records, came up with some very idiosyncratic chord progressions, like the E to C on Strawberry Flats);


Hmm, I only have _Let It Roll_ and the followup _Representing the Mambo_. _Roll_ is great. _Mambo_ did not impress at all.

Quote:
Fairport Convention (Richard Thompson's band, the first record's It's Alright Ma (It's Only Witchcraft) and its perfect covers of Dylan, Joni Mitchell, and The Merry-Go-Round match well)


Yet another one of those musical artists that I've avoided forever, for no particularly good reason, except that everyone I know likes them. *rolls eyes*

Quote:
Hey Cheetah, ever heard Jellyfish? If you're into Queen, you'd probably like them. One of the best bands of the 90's that no one remembers, they have great multi-part harmonies and complex arrangements to go with some really choice songs.


Well, I got _Split Milk_ by accident [read="didn't decline BMG main selection in time" :) ] several years ago and I've never listened to it until just now. Some of that *does* sound a lot like Queen, with maybe a little TMBG cutesiness thrown in for good measure. So if I like it, and so far I think I do, would I also like _Bellybutton_? :)


Lee (and there's absolutely nothing wrong with TMBG cutesiness, either)
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Scott



Joined: 31 Jul 2006
Posts: 1310

PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2006 3:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tdcheetah wrote:
Howdy! This is official notice that I have not been ignoring your post or you, but going this last week without AC made any extended stints sitting at the computer rather exhausting. There were moments I thought my brain had melted (or at least half-drowned from all the water in the air).


Understood. :) Sorry I had to cut things short last night also, this working for 26 days straight is going to suck, I'm not even halfway through and I'm hitting the wall already. Ugh.

Scott wrote:
Since I don't have an IPod (or any type of portable mp3 player for that matter), I'll just list my top 5 albums for home/work listening currently. BTW, if I were in the market for a portable mp3 player in the next month or two, what would y'all recommend?

Well, I know one person who's had 5 of the HP "iPod clones", and all have gone under during the warranty period.

I love the size of the 60 GB iPod (though of course I wish it was bigger, as I'm up to 80+ GB of MP3 with shelves to go yet...). The interface and software on the iPod itself is okay, but the way iTunes is built to function (or in some cases, built NOT to function) is rapidly starting to piss me off. Grrr. :)

You can set up iTunes to rip plain MP3s rather than Apple's proprietary AAC format, but I've been using something called "Exact Audio Copy" because it can do Variable Bit Rate [i.e., compresses more where less sound is going on = smaller file sizes. I'm all about balancing audio quality with the ability to get a few more songs on the Pod :) ]


Quote:
1) Steely Dan's "A Decade Of Steely Dan": Kid Charlemagne, My Old School, Reeling In The Years, Bodhissatva (sp?). A little bit of jazz rock listening. My favorite song on the album is Kid Charlemagne, with Larry Carlton on guitar. Mmm mmm good.

I loved enough deep cuts from Steely Dan that I got both _Can't Buy A Thrill_ ("Dirty Work", "Kings", "Only a Fool Would Say That") and _Katy Lied_ ("Black Friday", "Doctor Wu", "Everyone's Gone To The Movies") ages ago. Picked up _Royal Scam_ more recently; not as enamored of it.

The live "Bodhisattva" from _Alive in America_ is Awesome. If you like the studio one, you *want* this. :) _AiA_ also has a "Kid Charlemagne", but I'm not sure that it's that much better than the album version... does have some pretty cool additional instrumentation and er, alternate singing styles for "Reelin' in the Years", though.

Have you ever listened to any of Fagen's solo stuff? I'm crazy about _Nightfly_: even that stupid "I.G.Y." song gets some play, but the whole of what was probably "Side 2" on the original album [ok, I actually miss the days when "sides" of album affected the order and placement of songs...] from "New Frontier" through "Walk Between the Raindrops" is terrific. However, _Morph the Cat_ hasn't done anything for me.


My CD collection doesn't branch out too much at the moment from well-known artists. The Outlaws is about as obscure as I get right now. I'll take that under advisement. :)


Quote:
2) Son Seals "Deluxe Edition": Funky Bitch, Hot Sauce, Telephone Angel. It's not that I don't like B.B., but I find myself listening to Son more. In particular, Funky Bitch is one of my new all-time favorite blues songs.

Hmm, that's some nice guitar sound there. Gotta put this on a blues list...


I tell ya, he's freakin awesome. In his early years (at least through the 70s), the guitars he used he bought from places like Montgomery Ward (his first album was done on a "Norma") and Sears. It's amazing the sound he could get out of guitars like that.

Quote:
3) The Outlaws "Green Grass and High Tides": The title track (which is to The Outlaws as Freebird is to Skynyrd, but you don't hear it on the radio ten times a day), Stick Around For Rock and Roll, Freeborn Man. These guys are your basic 70s southern rock band, except they wander towards a country sound more, with several of their songs having quite the country twang on guitar. There's more good listening than just the three songs I mentioned, but those stick out. Their instrumental "Waterhole" makes me envision Dukes of Hazzard car chases when I listen to it (no lie!)

Wow, that initial review at Amazon is pretty good... in not putting the album over, that is. Normally I'll discount the "official Amazon review" a bit for a mildly positively bias [aka "listen, we wanna move this product"] - so on that scale, that review is downright savage!

I did like what I could hear of "Freeborn Man" and "Hurry Sundown". Not as excited by some of the slower stuff, but then that's typical with me. :)



That review is pretty brutal, and apparently done by someone who doesn't know southern rock very well. They don't sound anything like Skynyrd or Marshall Tucker, and there's only the faintest resemblence to the Allmans there. That goober doesn't know what he's talking about.

Quote:
4) Rush "Hold Your Fire": Prime Mover, Lock And Key, Force Ten. I tend to rotate through Rush albums regularly, I'm usually always listening to one, it's this album's turn now.

And I just caught the lovely "Tai Shan" off that one, which of course *would* have to be an instant exception to my comment about slower stuff immediately above. :)

I have a distinct fondness for _Roll the Bones_ partly because it was the first Rush work I was able to hear in its entirety, rather than just catching the (dreadfully overplayed) greatest hits randomly on the radio.


Believe it or not, the last Rush album I bought was Counterparts. I guess I just like their old-school stuff more than the new direction they're going. Not that it's crap or anything, just not quite my thing.


Quote:
5) AC/DC "Flick of the Switch": House Is On Fire, Guns For Hire, Badlands. People bust on this album, but I don't think it's all that bad. Granted, it's not one of their best ones, but I do like the first two songs I mentioned a lot. And as far as AC/DC albums, "Fly On the Wall" was a lot worse.

Doesn't sound too bad, or too much different than what AC/DC I already have... so on the list, but not very high on the list. :)


It's not a standout album as a whole, other than those three songs, the rest of the album is fairly pedestrian. But I do like those particular songs, so they keep that album around for me. :P :)

Quote:
I have some Afrika Bambataa on the shopping list (I don't care what anybody says, I still think Planet Rock kicks ass)

Hmm, here I didn't think I'd ever heard anything by Afrika Bambataa, but I do recognize at least two tracks off of the 1980-85 comp -- I just never knew who the artist was. So let me know what you think about what you get, and I may put it high up on the list.


Will do. After Afrika, the next branching out will probably be Kraftwerk. Know anything about them?


Quote:
Bob Seger

Can't speak at all on his studio stuff, but if you like his music at all I can highly recommend both _Live Bullet_ and _Nine Tonight_ as tremendous representations of Seger live.


Some stuff I like live, and some stuff I hate live. One song I hate hearing live (even though I usually like their live stuff) is Subdivisions by Rush. I think the studio recording captures everything perfectly. Maybe the guitar can be a little more present, but other than that, I think the studio recording beats the heck out of any live rendition I've heard.


Quote:

Lee (hey, some people just sound so much better live
than in the studio... and some sound much the same.
Which sameness may, or may not, be a good thing.)


Indeed. :)


Scott
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jdw
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2006 3:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



tdcheetah wrote:
Lee (hey, some people just sound so much better live
than in the studio...


Crows~!

:P


John
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jdw
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2006 3:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



tdcheetah wrote:
Howdy! This is official notice that I have not been ignoring your post or you,


And don't think I haven't noticed you ignoring a certain gimmick that you lifted from me. ;)


John, who still has the extended version of Waylon Jennings Live in the heavy rotation along with American V and Personal File...
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Iron Chad



Joined: 01 Aug 2006
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2006 8:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My rotation is pretty boring and not helpful to anyone really looking to branch out:

American V and Personal File - Yeah, though I'm probably about to knock V out of my heavy rotation since parts of it are really hard for me to listen too. I don't like hearing Johnny wheeze and shit, but it is a blowaway album especially considering the time when it was recorded. Personal File might as well be called American 0.5. It's a shame no one picked up on these sooner, but I'm glad they finally got released.

The Fray - Coldplay with less whining. I like to listen to piano driven stuff that's not Elton John or Billy Joel occassionally. These guys try to rock a bit, the single "Over My Head" is good stuff. I'll be burned out on it before too long, though.

Tech9 - I got sucked into him by running across "I'm a Playa" (hip hop with the beat from "Rock Me Amadeus - I'm a playa, I'm a playa, oh oh oh, I'm a playa". The song gives you good tips on balancing several girls at once, "don't be a dope and use her soap `cause it will leave a scent". His other stuff ranges from decent to really good if you like rap and stuff. A nice change from the usual Snoop and Tupac I listen to.

The usual Pink Floyd, though I'm listening to tons more of them live (especially the Wall) than I used to. I prefer the live Wall to the studio version at this point. I'll also work in the Roger Waters live Wall from Berlin if I want to throw myself a curveball.

I've also been listening to Steve Earle's live album from 1992 or so, Shut Up and Die Like a Man or something like that, a whole bunch, and that's about it.

-Chad
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JHM



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PostPosted: Mon Aug 28, 2006 10:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Really into Sam Cooke right now, he almost has the same effect of me that Patsy Cline does where I'm just blown away by his voice and all the neat things he can do with it.

I'm rotating Bowie's Berlin era albums right now, but haven't listened to them quite enough yet to get a real read on where I stand on them other then I know I really like parts of them and haven't yet disliked any of them. Certainly they intrigue me.

I got an ABBA collection and so they are my pop listening right now.

I click intentionally on Billie Holliday more then most right now, I just have a soft spot for elegant voices over soothing music.

Checked out Regina Spektor's Begin to Hope for a similar reason, I like her funny accent and willingness to have some fun with her music.

I just downloaded Modern Times, so far its been pretty good, although he does seem to pick standards for his blues covers which leads to comparisions that are tough for him to win. I have a really hard time not liking Bob's jazzy stuff right now and so far those have really hit me nicely.
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Frank_Jewett
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2007 12:30 am    Post subject: Stuck in the seventies Reply with quote

Flaming Telepaths - Blue Oyster Cult (1975)

Pop-metal with a simple, catchy keyboard riff. The original "Rainbow in the Dark"

Mr. Big Stuff - Jean Knight (1971)

Great funk, like Motown with attitude rather than a muddy mess of noise.

Luckenbach, Texas - Waylon Jennings (1977)

Gotta love country songs where fame and fortune ain't all they're cracked up to be.

Blockbuster - The Sweet (1973)

Sirens, reverb, breathless lead vocals, screaming - all the excesses of glam rock in one song.

Victim of Changes - Judas Priest (1976)

None of the metal fans I knew in the eighties had any clue about this song. It's as if Judas Priest revived the corpse of Black Sabbath (creatively dead by 1976) and wrung one more dark, driving, brooding, screaming dirge out of them. Way cooler than the NWOBHM anthems Priest was selling on MTV in the early eighties.
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tdcheetah



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PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2007 7:11 pm    Post subject: Hard Rock vs. Heavy Metal - where do *you* fall? Reply with quote

Frank_Jewett wrote:
Flaming Telepaths - Blue Oyster Cult (1975)

Pop-metal with a simple, catchy keyboard riff. The original "Rainbow in the Dark"


Oh, I am such a sucker for Blue Oyster Cult, esp live stuff where they get all extended play on me. I have two different live versions of "Before the Kiss, A Redcap" which I can tell apart by the pacing of the beginning.

I also loved "The Red and the Black" from _Extraterrestial Live_, which meant I was just horribly disappointed by the album version.

Quote:
Blockbuster - The Sweet (1973)

Sirens, reverb, breathless lead vocals, screaming - all the excesses of glam rock in one song.


Sweet are sweet and there's absolutely nothing wrong with glam rock if you are doing it right. ;)

For CD albums I only have their classic _Desolation Boulevard_, but I also have something called _Blockbuster Alternate Takes_ [rare and live performances, and ironically for the title/description, only has one version of any song, including "Blockbuster". Also I have two live CDs (ok, one of them I actually suspect of being one of those "fake live in the studio" albums that record labels were always trying to pass off on us in the 70s).

Amusingly, my favorite local rockabilly band was playing last Friday and to start the third set off, for some reason the lead singer started quoting the intro to "Ballroom Blitz". I burst out laughing when he said, "Mick? Okay..." I think everyone else in the room was too old or way too young to get the reference. Perhaps you had to be there in 1973. :) Was nice to know he's likely a close contemporary of mine... too often while dancing I feel a distinct age gap. :/

And "Ballroom Blitz" is still one of my Top 2 Songs Not To Make It To #1 On Intitial Release. The other is Matthew Wilder's "The Kid's American". Why the irritating poppy "Break My Stride" hit big and not that... I guess there are some things that just can't be explained. Like the Pina Colada song. :)

Quote:
Victim of Changes - Judas Priest (1976)

None of the metal fans I knew in the eighties had any clue about this song. It's as if Judas Priest revived the corpse of Black Sabbath (creatively dead by 1976) and wrung one more dark, driving, brooding, screaming dirge out of them. Way cooler than the NWOBHM anthems Priest was selling on MTV in the early eighties.


Judas Priest? Yeah, though we didn't meet until the nineties you'll have to count me into that set of metal fans you knew: there's a band I have nothing of and know zip about.

Actually the latter part of that comment also goes for Sabbath itself, oddly enough: though I do have _Paranoid_ and _Symptom of the Universe_, which seems to be a GH comp from 1970-1978, on CD, I pretty much recognize "IRRRRRON MANNNNN" and that's it. (I also have _Blizzard of Oz_ and _Ozzman Cometh_ and I couldn't tell you ANY of the songs from those!)

Any recommendations for either? You probably have a good sense of my general taste, but in an attempt to stir up heavy metal controversy ;) I'll throw up some general comments about artists I already have:

Anthrax: has everything I like about Pantera, except music. Metal. Their cover of Joe Jackson's "Got the Time" is total kick ass.

Blue Oyster Cult: heavy metal. Maybe the solid center of metal, even.

Bon Jovi: yes, they are heavy metal. The lightest possible heavy metal, but they are.

The Cult: hard rock. I own waaay too much Cult, though strangely no live stuff unlike BOC.

Guns'n'Roses: they are as close to the dividing line for me between hard rock and heavy metal as you can get without being Van Halen I. I honestly *think* they are HR, but then I only own _Appetite for Destruction_ so I don't have as broad a knowledge of their overall work.

Metallica: sure, I love "Enter Sandman", but otherwise I don't get why some people thought they were the greatest. Lack of competition?

Scorpions/Michael Schenker: heavy metal. Doesn't hurt being German.

Van Halen: early VH are the dividing line for hard rock/heavy metal. On the HR side lie AC/DC, Aerosmith, Extreme, Night Ranger, Queen, etc. On the HM side lie Cinderella, Iron Maiden, Poison, Slaughter, Twisted Sister, W.A.S.P, White Lion, and our local cult fave, Kix.

Whitesnake: heavy metal, really, it is, I swear. I also own _Coverdale/Page_ which IMHO is an underrated work, but I find I can't play it anymore unless I'm indecently happy since it feels like just this relentless downer of an disc, like birds slowly suffocating in an oil slick.

Yngwie Malmsteen: it's hip to slag Malmsteen for being a soulless guitar hero. But sometimes, you need just that, vs. Steve Vai caring too much, or Joe Satriani singing. :)


Lee
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Frank_Jewett
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2007 10:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you are going to listen to old Black Sabbath, listen to "The Wizard" from their first album and "War Pigs" from their second album.

"The Wizard" featured screeching harmonica and simplistic power riffs that suggested Black Sabbath was the heir to the musical legacy of the Yardbirds even though Led Zeppelin rose from the ashes of that group.

"War Pigs" showed that Black Sabbath had more to offer than the driving power and relative simplicity of "Paranoid" and "Iron Man."

"Children of the Grave", from Sabbath's third album, was an amazing leap forward to the speed metal and death metal of the mid-eighties. In just two years, Sabbath laid the groundwork for two decades of heavy metal.

If you liked Michael Schenker and the other Bach and Roll guitar gods, you should listen to some UFO.

"Rock Bottom" was a simple, driving power rocker in the vein of Black Sabbath, but Schenker's incredible solo raised it to the level of an all-time seventies metal classic. Schenker built slowly to a pyrotechnic finish, correctly judging that the build should be much longer than the "rave up" crescendo. Schenker then trailed off, allowing the trademark riff to bring the song around to a roaring finish.

"Lights Out" was one of the great seventies metal albums. "Too Hot To Handle" and the title track are simple hard rockers, but "Love To Love" was a Zeppelinesque epic. "Just Another Suicide" was a great rocker while power ballad "Try Me" showcases Schenker's blues chops.

Judas Priest was a high profile part of the "New Wave of British Heavy Metal" with video "Breaking The Law" from "British Steel." The Midnight Rockers theme song, "Living After Midnight" came from the same album, so you heard Priest back in the day even though you didn't know it. In the late seventies, Priest's music stood out the way Metallica's music stood out in the late eighties. Whether that's good or bad is a matter of opinion, but I think history favors Priest's earlier, groundbreaking work.

"Victim Of Changes" blew away the field in 1976 the way Sabbath blew away the field in 1970-1971. The composition of the sound was different from the rest of the hard rock and heavy metal acts. It was more unified during the structured parts of the song and more powerful during the solos.

Frank

(Actually spending more time listening to sixties country classics like "Six Days On The Road" by Dave Dudley.)
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Frank_Jewett
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2007 9:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was still finding my way out of the country music wilderness...

Family Tradition - Hank Williams, Jr. (1979)

I love the way Hank's lyrics flip the bird at the establishment while the music shifts from fiddle to steel guitar to electric guitar behind him. Was this an incredible arrangement or am I hitting the bong? Too bad i-tunes doesn't have Montana Cafe.

Liking Hank sent me back through the Southern Rock catalog. I've long enjoyed "Heard It In A Love Song", but I was ignorant of...

Can't You See - The Marshall Tucker Band (1973)

The lyrics can be a little offputting (unless you are really pissed off at that special someone), but the music is gorgeous regardless.

B.O.C. is still in the rotation...

Astronomy - Blue Oyster Cult (1974)
I Love the Night - Blue Oyster Cult (1977)


B.O.C. is a band that wasn't homogenous enough for my tastes twenty years ago, but now I enjoy their variety and experimentation. I enjoy "Astronomy" so much that I'm giving prog rock another chance. "I Love The Night" reminds me of "Always Somewhere" by the Scorpions, or vice-versa, since "Always Somewhere" was recorded two years later.

One Of These Days - Pink Floyd (1971)

A Pink Floyd song that doesn't sound suicidal, but having no lyrics helps.

Frank
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eron



Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 412

PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2007 10:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nine Inch Nails - Year Zero

http://yearzero.nin.com/

I know, big shocker. Whole thing is leaked. "The Good Soldier", "Capital G", "God Given", "Meet Your Master", "In this Twilight" and "Zero Sum" are the stand out tracks.
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Andrew D. Lacelle®



Joined: 02 Aug 2006
Posts: 6
Location: Wherever I go, there I am

PostPosted: Fri Apr 20, 2007 9:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Frank_Jewett wrote:
I was still finding my way out of the country music wilderness...

Family Tradition - Hank Williams, Jr. (1979)

I love the way Hank's lyrics flip the bird at the establishment while the music shifts from fiddle to steel guitar to electric guitar behind him. Was this an incredible arrangement or am I hitting the bong? Too bad i-tunes doesn't have Montana Cafe.

Liking Hank sent me back through the Southern Rock catalog. I've long enjoyed "Heard It In A Love Song", but I was ignorant of...

Can't You See - The Marshall Tucker Band (1973)

The lyrics can be a little offputting (unless you are really pissed off at that special someone), but the music is gorgeous regardless.

B.O.C. is still in the rotation...

Astronomy - Blue Oyster Cult (1974)
I Love the Night - Blue Oyster Cult (1977)


B.O.C. is a band that wasn't homogenous enough for my tastes twenty years ago, but now I enjoy their variety and experimentation. I enjoy "Astronomy" so much that I'm giving prog rock another chance. "I Love The Night" reminds me of "Always Somewhere" by the Scorpions, or vice-versa, since "Always Somewhere" was recorded two years later.

One Of These Days - Pink Floyd (1971)

A Pink Floyd song that doesn't sound suicidal, but having no lyrics helps.

Frank


If you can find The American Way by Hank Williams Jr., I highly recommend you give it a listen. It contains my current favorite lyric in a song
Some high society lady says "Is your horse outside?"
"No m'am he's between my legs but you're too fat to ride."

Just fantastic. It's a song about how the white collars run the US and it's just a great song to get one pumped up.

Marshall Tucker Band is pretty damned great, if you dug some of their stuff check out The Ozark Mountain Daredevils, two songs that I can't recommend enough are Homemade Wine and Leatherwood.
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