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Reason #23175 Why I Loathe The RIAA

 
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tdcheetah



Joined: 27 Jul 2006
Posts: 487
Location: The Cheetah's Lair (aka Clarendon VA)

PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2007 11:20 pm    Post subject: Reason #23175 Why I Loathe The RIAA Reply with quote

From http://www.riaa.com/news/marketingdata/cost.asp

Quote:
Clearly there are many costs associated with producing a CD, and despite these costs the price of recorded music to consumers has fallen dramatically since CDs were first introduced in 1983. Between 1983 and 1996, the average price of a CD fell by more than 40%. Over this same period of time, consumer prices (measured by the Consumer Price Index, or CPI) rose nearly 60%. If CD prices had risen at the same rate as consumer prices over this period, the average retail price of a CD in 1996 would have been $33.86 instead of $12.75. While the price of CDs has fallen, the amount of music provided on a typical CD has increased substantially, along with higher quality in terms of fidelity, durability, ease of use, and range of choices, including multi-media material, such as music videos, interviews and discographies. Content of this type often requires considerable production expense and adds a whole new dimension that goes beyond conventional audio.


*shaking head*

Grrrrr...

The RIAA? Doesn't get it. So doesn't get it. Really, truly, ostrich-head-in-sand doesn't get it.


From http://www.newyorker.com/critics/music/articles/060626crmu_music

Quote:
Radiohead no longer has a contract with EMI and says that it has no plans to sign with a label. However the band chooses to release its next record, it can still make a handsome living by touring and selling merchandise. Labels spend a lot of time and money worrying about illegal downloading and file-sharing. What they should be worried about is more bands like Radiohead, which could make major labels a relic of the twentieth century.


Go Radiohead. Obsolete those motherfuckers.


Lee, who loves music and musicians, but thinks the record industry is "don't touch it! it's pure evil!"

(I'd be hard-pressed to decide who I hate more: Bud Selig, or the RIAA.)
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eron



Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 412

PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2007 12:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
While the price of CDs has fallen, the amount of music provided on a typical CD has increased substantially, along with higher quality in terms of fidelity, durability, ease of use, and range of choices, including multi-media material, such as music videos, interviews and discographies. Content of this type often requires considerable production expense and adds a whole new dimension that goes beyond conventional audio.


The only thing I believe on any of that is when you're mixing an album into 5.1, especially an older album. That might cost a little.

"Multimedia material" is a useless addition with most albums that is done in hopes that people won't simply buy the MP3. It's also very un-costly.

What the RIAA should admit is that all of the money they've placed into trying to copyright protect music has been creating a burning hole in their pocket they have not yet been able to re-cooperate.

Soon, record labels will only have one real purpose: Money Loans. That's all it'll be. It'll be "Interscope Music Loans", where they will give you a wack of cash to make a video, advertise their tour and get studio time. The "A&R" guy will now be just there to decide whether you should get said loan based on your musical ability.
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tdcheetah



Joined: 27 Jul 2006
Posts: 487
Location: The Cheetah's Lair (aka Clarendon VA)

PostPosted: Thu Jul 23, 2009 12:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Artists Find Backers as Labels Wane

Quote:
There was a time when most aspiring musicians had the same dream: to sign a deal with a major record label.

Now, with the structure of the music business shifting radically, some industry iconoclasts are sidestepping the music giants and inventing new ways for artists to make and market their music — without ever signing a traditional recording contract.


Article mentions a variety of approaches including:

- marquee musicians like Trent Reznor, the Beastie Boys and Barenaked Ladies... creat[ing] their own artist-run labels

- Radiohead distributing its last album online for free/optional payment

- Polyphonic, formed to help rising bands, whose founders are Brian Message [mgr of Radiohead], Adam Driscoll [chief executive of the British media company MAMA Group], and Terry McBride of the management firm Nettwerk[/mgr of Barenaked Ladies].

- the example of the band Metric, which declined a recording contract, made its own album and offered it in the iTunes store.

- indy-focused services such as Topspin, which helps manage a band’s online presence, and TuneCore, a company that distributes music to online services like iTunes, Amazon and Napster

Quote:
EMI took the unusual step of creating a music services division to provide an array of services — like touring and merchandise support — to musicians who were not signed to the label, such as R&B singer Bobby Valentino and Raekwon, a member of the Wu-Tang Clan


Look, Eron! Your comment from 2007 is spot on. :)


Lee, still undecided in the "Worse Evil: Selig vs. RIAA?" great debate
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tdcheetah



Joined: 27 Jul 2006
Posts: 487
Location: The Cheetah's Lair (aka Clarendon VA)

PostPosted: Thu Jul 30, 2009 3:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Big Content: ludicrous to expect DRMed music to work forever

Quote:
Rightsholders can't understand why people who bought DRMed music only to have the authentication servers go dark might demand the right to crack the DRM. Big Content believes the idea that rightsholders "are required to provide consumers with perpetual access to copyrighted works" is laughable. Ha ha.


Apparently, Steven Metalitz is the Washington DC lawyer who represents the MPAA, RIAA, and other rightsholders before the Copyright Office, which is in the midst of a triennial review of the DCMA.

Quote:
[Metalitz] has now responded to a host of questions from the Copyright Office following up on live hearings held earlier this year, and in those comments, Metalitz (again) strongly opposes any exemption that would allow users to legally strip DRM from content if a store goes dark and takes down its authentication servers.

"We reject the view," he writes in a letter to the top legal advisor at the Copyright Office, "that copyright owners and their licensees are required to provide consumers with perpetual access to creative works. No other product or service providers are held to such lofty standards. No one expects computers or other electronics devices to work properly in perpetuity, and there is no reason that any particular mode of distributing copyrighted works should be required to do so."


*bangs head*


Lee
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eron



Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 412

PostPosted: Thu Jul 30, 2009 6:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tdcheetah wrote:
- Radiohead distributing its last album online for free/optional payment


Radiohead really didn't do it the right way, they were just the first ones. All of the MP3s were of low quality compared to purchase quality. NIN did it soon afterward with Ghosts (Four part series, first two parts free) and the Slip (completely free, perfect sound).

I'll also add that Trent Reznor actually closed up his record label after leaving Interscope Records. Jimmy Iovine gave it to him back in '94 after getting him out of TVT. He does have a form of label for releasing his stuff, but its really not a label.

tdcheetah wrote:
- the example of the band Metric, which declined a recording contract, made its own album and offered it in the iTunes store.


Good band too. "Dead Disco" is a great tune.

tdcheetah wrote:
Look, Eron! Your comment from 2007 is spot on. :)


Nice to see I got that one right. I was completely wrong with my prediction that bands would start releasing records with music videos for each song.

The future of music is the CC license that allows people to manipulate and own as much music as they want, as long as they make no profit from it.
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CTC



Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 92

PostPosted: Tue Aug 11, 2009 1:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tdcheetah wrote:

Quote:

"We reject the view," he writes in a letter to the top legal advisor at the Copyright Office, "that copyright owners and their licensees are required to provide consumers with perpetual access to creative works. No other product or service providers are held to such lofty standards. No one expects computers or other electronics devices to work properly in perpetuity, and there is no reason that any particular mode of distributing copyrighted works should be required to do so."

*bangs head*
Lee

Wow, how did I miss this thread for this long?

But this one's a great quote. Hello, books are more or less "perpetual access". Take care of a DVD or CD, and it's "perpetual access". This is almost as dumb as that Stephen Hawking thing in the healthcare thread. Almost.

Also...Selig vs. the RIAA, it's RIAA, easily. Selig doesn't sue children - Hell, I doubt a kid would even get thrown out of a game if they reached over the outfield fences to grab a ball. What happened to Bartman, or that kid in the Yanks/Orioles playoff game? Those incidents didn't make him circle the wagons and ban baseball gloves at all ballparks, or anything shitheaded like that.

Plus, as much as Selig is helping kill baseball, the job seems to be killing him, too. He's one red vinyl jacket away from scrounging for pineal glands and performing intricate dance routines. I think he's my pick in the Celebrity Death Pool, in fact. But RIAA? They're a faceless, largely nameless bunch of corporations who are trying to legalistically bend the world over the barrel. They're unapologetic parasites, and therefore are far more evil.

Sorry for the threadjack.
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